Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Published in
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®
Volume 475 | Issue 2 | Feb, 2017
Articles

Poor Survivorship and Frequent Complications at a Median of 10 Years After Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Revision

Gulraj S. Matharu BSc (Hons), MRCS, MRes, Hemant G. Pandit DPhil, FRCS (Tr & Orth), David W. Murray MD, FRCS (Orth)

High short-term failure rates have been reported for several metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MoMHR) designs. Early observations suggested that MoMHRs revised to total hip arthroplasties (THAs) for pseudotumor had more major complications and inferior patient-reported outcomes compared with other revision indications. However, little is known about implant survivorship and patient-reported outcomes at more than 5 years after MoMHR revision.

The John Charnley Award: Redefining the Natural History of Osteoarthritis in Patients With Hip Dysplasia and Impingement

Cody C. Wyles BS, Mark J. Heidenreich MD, Jack Jeng MD, Dirk R. Larson MD, Robert T. Trousdale MD, Rafael J. Sierra MD

Structural hip deformities including developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) are thought to predispose patients to degenerative joint changes. However, the natural history of these malformations is not clearly delineated.

The Frank Stinchfield Award

William W. Schairer MD, Joseph M. Lane MD, David A. Halsey MD, Richard Iorio MD, Douglas E. Padgett MD, Alexander S. McLawhorn MD, MBA

Hip fractures are a major public health concern. For displaced femoral neck fractures, the needs for medical services during hospitalization and extending beyond hospital discharge after total hip arthroplasty (THA) may be different than the needs after THA performed for osteoarthritis (OA), yet these differences are largely uncharacterized, and the Medicare Severity Diagnosis-Related Groups system does not distinguish between THA performed for fracture and OA.

Otto Aufranc Award: A Multicenter, Randomized Study of Outpatient versus Inpatient Total Hip Arthroplasty

Nitin Goyal MD, Antonia F. Chen MD, MBA, Sarah E. Padgett PA-C, Timothy L. Tan MD, Michael M. Kheir MD, Robert H. Hopper PhD, William G. Hamilton MD, William J. Hozack MD

Length of stay after total hip arthroplasty (THA) has decreased over the last two decades. However, published studies that have examined same-day and early discharge protocols after THA have been done in highly selected patient groups operated on by senior surgeons in a nonrandomized fashion without control subjects.

Two- to 4-Year Followup of a Short Stem THA Construct: Excellent Fixation, Thigh Pain a Concern

Richard L. Amendola MS, Devon D. Goetz MD, Steve S. Liu MD, John J. Callaghan MD

Short stem cementless femoral components were developed to aid insertion through smaller incisions, preserve metaphyseal bone, and potentially decrease or limit the incidence of thigh pain. Despite some clinical success, the senior author (DDG) believed a higher percentage of his patients who had received a cementless short stem design were experiencing thigh pain, which, coupled with concerns about bone ingrowth fixation, motivated the review of this case series.

Reconstruction of the Shallow Acetabulum With a Combination of Autologous Bulk and Impaction Bone Grafting Fixed by Cement

Masaaki Maruyama MD, PhD, Shinji Wakabayashi MD, PhD, Hiroshi Ota MD, PhD, Keiji Tensho MD, PhD

Acetabular bone deficiency, especially proximal and lateral deficiency, is a difficult technical problem during primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We report a new reconstruction method using a medial-reduced cemented socket and additional bulk bone in conjunction with impaction morselized bone grafting (additional bulk bone grafting method).

Survivorship of the Bernese Periacetabular Osteotomy: What Factors are Associated with Long-term Failure?

Joel Wells MD, MPH, Michael Millis MD, Young-Jo Kim MD, PhD, Evgeny Bulat MA, Patricia Miller MS, Travis Matheney MD

The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) continues to be a commonly performed nonarthroplasty option to treat symptomatic developmental hip dysplasia, but there are few long-term followup studies evaluating results after PAO.

How Reliable Is the Alpha-defensin Immunoassay Test for Diagnosing Periprosthetic Joint Infection? A Prospective Study

Tommaso Bonanzinga MD, Akos Zahar MD, Michael Dütsch MSc, Christian Lausmann MD, Daniel Kendoff MD, PhD, Thorsten Gehrke MD

A key issue in the treatment of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the correct diagnosis. The main problem is lack of diagnostic tools able to diagnose a PJI with high accuracy. Alpha-defensin has been proposed as a possible solution, but in the current literature, there is a lack of independent validation.

One-stage Revision With Catheter Infusion of Intraarticular Antibiotics Successfully Treats Infected THA

Leo A. Whiteside MD, M. E. Roy PhD

Two-stage revision surgery for infected total hip arthroplasty (THA) is commonly advocated, but substantial morbidity and expense are associated with this technique. In certain cases of infected THA, treatment with one-stage revision surgery and intraarticular infusion of antibiotics may offer a reasonable alternative with the distinct advantage of providing a means of delivering the drug in high concentrations.

What Is the Natural History of Asymptomatic Pseudotumors in Metal-on-metal THAs at Mid-term Followup?

Sujith Konan MBBS, MD (res), FRCS(Tr&Orth), Clive P. Duncan MD, MSc, FRCSC, Bassam S. Masri MD, FRCSC, Donald S. Garbuz MD, MSc, FRCSC

The risk of early revision because of pseudotumors in patients who have undergone large-head metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) is well documented. However, the natural history of asymptomatic pseudotumors or of MoM articulations without pseudotumors is less well understood. The aim of our study was to investigate the natural history of primary MoM THA at mid-term followup.

Do Bone Graft and Cracking of the Sclerotic Cavity Improve Fixation of Titanium and Hydroxyapatite-coated Revision Implants in an Animal Model?

Brian Elmengaard MD, PhD, Joergen Baas MD, PhD, Thomas Jakobsen MD, PhD, Soren Kold MD, PhD, Thomas B. Jensen MD, PhD, Joan E. Bechtold PhD, Kjeld Soballe MD, DSc

We previously introduced a manual surgical technique that makes small perforations (cracks) through the sclerotic bone shell that typically forms during the process of aseptic loosening (“crack” revision technique). Perforating just the shell (without violating the proximal cortex) can maintain overall bone continuity while allowing marrow and vascular elements to access the implant surface. Because many revisions require bone graft to fill defects, we wanted to determine if bone graft could further increase implant fixation beyond what we have experimentally shown with the crack technique alone. Also, because both titanium (Ti6Al4V) and hydroxyapatite (HA) implant surfaces are used in revisions, we also wanted to determine their relative effectiveness in this model.

No Correlation Between Serum Markers and Early Functional Outcome After Contemporary THA

Kirsten L. Poehling-Monaghan MD, Michael J. Taunton MD, Atul F. Kamath MD, Robert T. Trousdale MD, Rafael J. Sierra MD, Mark W. Pagnano MD

Serum markers of inflammation and muscle damage have shown clinical utility in some areas of medicine, but their value in determining the invasiveness or in predicting the early functional outcomes after total hip arthroplasty (THA) has not been demonstrated.

No Decrease in Knee Survivorship or Outcomes Scores for Patients With HIV Infection Who Undergo TKA

Kimona Issa MD, Todd P. Pierce MD, Steven F. Harwin MD, Anthony J. Scillia MD, Anthony Festa MD, Michael A. Mont MD

HIV is prevalent worldwide and numerous patients with this diagnosis ultimately may become candidates for TKA. Although some studies have suggested that complications are more common in patients with HIV who undergo TKA, these studies largely were done before the contemporary era of HIV management; moreover, it is unclear whether patients with HIV achieve lower patient-reported outcome scores or inferior implant survivorship.

What Risks are Associated with Primary THA in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation?

Brian P. Chalmers MD, Cameron K. Ledford MD, Joseph M. Statz MD, Tad M. Mabry MD, Arlen D. Hanssen MD, Matthew P. Abdel MD

As patients who receive hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are at increased risk of avascular necrosis (AVN) and subsequent degenerative arthritis, THA may be considered in some of these patients, particularly as overall patient survival improves for patients undergoing stem-cell transplants. Patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation theoretically are at increased risk of experiencing complications, infection, and poorer implant survivorship owing to the high prevalence of comorbid conditions, immunosuppressive therapy regimens including corticosteroids, and often low circulating hematopoietic cell lines; however, there is a paucity of studies elucidating these risks.

Periprosthetic Occult Fractures of the Acetabulum Occur Frequently During Primary THA

Kazuhiro Hasegawa MD, Tamon Kabata MD, PhD, Yoshitomo Kajino MD, PhD, Daisuke Inoue MD, Hiroyuki Tsuchiya MD, PhD

Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum occurring during primary THA are rare. Periprosthetic occult fractures are defined as those not identified by the surgeon during the procedure which might be missed on a routine postoperative radiograph. However, it is unclear how frequently these fractures occur and whether their presence affects functional recovery.

What Factors are Associated With Quality Of Life, Pain Interference, Anxiety, and Depression in Patients With Metastatic Bone Disease?

Q. M. J. van der Vliet BSc, N. R. Paulino Pereira MD, S. J. Janssen MD, F. J. Hornicek MD, MS, PhD, M. L. Ferrone MD, J. A. M. Bramer MD, PhD, C. N. van Dijk MD, PhD, J. H. Schwab MD, MS

It would be helpful for the decision-making process of patients with metastatic bone disease to understand which patients are at risk for worse quality of life (QOL), pain, anxiety, and depression. Normative data, and where these stand compared with general population scores, can be useful to compare and interpret results of similar patients or patient groups, but to our knowledge, there are no such robust data.

Are Biopsy Tracts a Concern for Seeding and Local Recurrence in Sarcomas?

Irene Barrientos-Ruiz MD, Eduardo José Ortiz-Cruz MD, PhD, José Serrano-Montilla MD, Daniel Bernabeu-Taboada MD, Jose Juan Pozo-Kreilinger MD

A biopsy is the final step in the diagnosis of sarcomas. Complete resection of the biopsy tract traditionally has been recommended in musculoskeletal oncology guidelines, as that tract is considered potentially seeded with tumor cells. However, to our knowledge, the frequency and implications of contamination of the biopsy tract—specifically with respect to the likelihood of local recurrence—and the factors that affect cell seeding are not well described.

Reduction in Cylindrical Grasp Strength Is Associated With Early Thumb Carpometacarpal Osteoarthritis

Monica J. Coughlan BS, Alexandra Bourdillon, Joseph J. Crisco PhD, Deborah Kenney MS, OTR, Arnold-Peter Weiss MD, Amy L. Ladd MD

Advanced thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis (OA) can cause substantial impairment in hand function, from grasping heavy objects to fine manipulation of implements and tools. In the clinical setting, we commonly measure the grip strength of gross grasp with a hand dynamometer in patients with CMC OA. Cylindrical grasp, which requires more thumb contribution than gross grasp, is an alternative method of measuring grip strength and one that may provide insight into thumb-related conditions. Because gross grasp and cylindrical grasp use the thumb in different planes, measurement of gross grasp alone might underestimate impairment. Therefore, it is important to evaluate cylindrical grasp as well. To our knowledge this tool has yet to be examined in a population with early thumb CMC OA.

High Irritation and Removal Rates After Plate or Nail Fixation in Patients With Displaced Midshaft Clavicle Fractures

Martijn H. J. Hulsmans MD, Mark Heijl MD, PhD, R. Marijn Houwert MD, PhD, Eric R. Hammacher MD, PhD, Sven A. G. Meylaerts MD, PhD, Michiel H. J. Verhofstad PhD, Marcel G. W. Dijkgraaf MD, PhD, Egbert J. M. M. Verleisdonk

Studies comparing plate with intramedullary nail fixation of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures show faster recovery in the plate group and implant-related complications in both groups after short-term followup (6 or 12 months). Knowledge of disability, complications, and removal rates beyond the first postoperative year will help surgeons in making a decision regarding optimal implant choice. However, comparative studies with followup beyond the first year or two are scarce.

A Crosswalk Between UCLA and Lower Extremity Activity Scales

Hassan M. K. Ghomrawi PhD, MPH, Yuo-yu Lee MS, Christina Herrero BS, Amethia Joseph BA, Douglas Padgett MD, Geoffrey Westrich MD, Michael Parks MD, Stephen Lyman PhD

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity scale and the Lower Extremity Activity Scale (LEAS) are the two most-widely used and rigorously developed scales for assessing activity level in patients having joint replacement. However, the two scales are not convertible, and the level of correlation between the two is not clear. Creating a crosswalk between these scales; that is, a concordance table to convert scores from one scale to the other and vice versa, will help compare results from existing studies using either scale, and pool those results for meta-analyses. It also will facilitate pooling data from multiple registries and data sources.

Do Needleless Knots have Similar Strength as the Krackow Suture? An In Vitro Porcine Tendon Study

Chih-Kai Hong MD, Ting-Hsuan Kuo, Ming-Long Yeh PhD, I-Ming Jou MD, PhD, Cheng-Li Lin MD, Wei-Ren Su MD, MSc

Numerous needleless techniques for tendon graft fixation that feature several advantages have been reported. However, there are few studies that have compared the holding strength between the needleless techniques (rolling hitch and modified rolling hitch) and traditional suture methods.

Classifications In Brief: The Tscherne Classification of Soft Tissue Injury

David A. Ibrahim MD, Alan Swenson MD, Adam Sassoon MD, Navin D. Fernando MD

Erratum to: What Is the Natural History of Asymptomatic Pseudotumors in Metal-on-metal THAs at Mid-term Followup?

Sujith Konan MBBS, MD (res), FRCS(Tr&Orth), Clive P. Duncan MD, MSc, FRCSC, Bassam S. Masri MD, FRCSC, Donald S. Garbuz MD, MSc, FRCSC
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