Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Published in
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®
Volume 475 | Issue 12 | Dec, 2017
Articles

Is There Variation in Procedural Utilization for Lumbar Spine Disorders Between a Fee-for-Service and Salaried Healthcare System?

Andrew J. Schoenfeld MD, MSc, Heeren Makanji MD, Wei Jiang MS, Tracey Koehlmoos PhD, Christopher M. Bono MD, Adil H. Haider MD, MPH

Whether compensation for professional services drives the use of those services is an important question that has not been answered in a robust manner. Specifically, there is a growing concern that spine care practitioners may preferentially choose more costly or invasive procedures in a fee-for-service system, irrespective of the underlying lumbar disorder being treated.

ArtiFacts: Ivory Hemiarthroplasty: The Forgotten Concept Lives On

Bartek Szostakowski MD, Jakub Jagiello MBBS, FRCS (Tr & Orth), John A. Skinner MBBS, FRCS (Eng), FRCS (Orth)

Perioperative Risk Adjustment for Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: Are Simple Clinically Driven Models Sufficient?

David N. Bernstein MA, Aakash Keswani BA, David Ring MD, PhD

There is growing interest in value-based health care in the United States. Statistical analysis of large databases can inform us of the factors associated with and the probability of adverse events and unplanned readmissions that diminish quality and add expense. For example, increased operating time and high blood urea nitrogen (BUN) are associated with adverse events, whereas patients on antihypertensive medications were more likely to have an unplanned readmission. Many surgeons rely on their knowledge and intuition when assessing the risk of a procedure. Comparing clinically driven with statistically derived risk models of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) offers insight into potential gaps between common practice and evidence-based medicine.

High Risk of Readmission in Octogenarians Undergoing Primary Hip Arthroplasty

Arthur L. Malkani MD, Brian Dilworth MD, Kevin Ong PhD, Doruk Baykal PhD, Edmund Lau MS, Theresa N. Mackin BA, Gwo-Chin Lee MD

As life expectancy increases, more elderly patients with end-stage hip arthritis are electing to undergo primary THA. Octogenarians undergoing THA have more comorbidities than younger patients, but this is not reflected in risk adjustment models for bundled care programs. The burden of care associated with THA in octogenarians has not been well characterized, and doing so may help these value-based programs make adjustments so that this vulnerable patient population does not risk losing access under accountable care models.

Results of Database Studies in Spine Surgery Can Be Influenced by Missing Data

Bryce A. Basques MD, Ryan P. McLynn BS, Michael P. Fice BS, Andre M. Samuel MD, Adam M. Lukasiewicz MD, MSc, Daniel D. Bohl MD, MPH, Junyoung Ahn MD, Kern Singh MD, Jonathan N. Grauer MD

National databases are increasingly being used for research in spine surgery; however, one limitation of such databases that has received sparse mention is the frequency of missing data. Studies using these databases often do not emphasize the percentage of missing data for each variable used and do not specify how patients with missing data are incorporated into analyses. This study uses the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database to examine whether different treatments of missing data can influence the results of spine studies.

What Are the Frequency, Associated Factors, and Mortality of Amputation and Arthrodesis After a Failed Infected TKA?

Min-Sun Son PhD, Edmund Lau MS, Javad Parvizi MD, Michael A. Mont MD, Kevin J. Bozic MD, MBA, Steven Kurtz PhD

For patients with failed surgical treatment of an infected TKA, salvage operations such as arthrodesis or above-knee amputation (AKA) may be considered. Clinical and institutional factors associated with AKA and arthrodesis after a failed TKA have not been investigated in a large-scale population, and the utilization rate and trend of these measures are not well known.

Definitional Differences of ‘Outpatient’ Versus ‘Inpatient’ THA and TKA Can Affect Study Outcomes

Patawut Bovonratwet BS, Matthew L. Webb MD, MHS, Nathaniel T. Ondeck BS, Adam M. Lukasiewicz MD, MSc, Jonathan J. Cui BS, Ryan P. McLynn BS, Jonathan N. Grauer MD

There has been great interest in performing outpatient THA and TKA. Studies have compared such procedures done as outpatients versus inpatients. However, stated “outpatient” status as defined by large national databases such as the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) may not be a consistent entity, and the actual lengths of stay of those patients categorized as outpatients in NSQIP have not been specifically ascertained and may in fact include some patients who are “observed” for one or more nights. Current regulations in the United States allow these “observed” patients to stay more than one night at the hospital under observation status despite being coded as outpatients. Determining the degree to which this is the case, and what, exactly, “outpatient” means in the NSQIP, may influence the way clinicians read studies from that source and the way hospital systems and policymakers use those data.

Which Clinical and Patient Factors Influence the National Economic Burden of Hospital Readmissions After Total Joint Arthroplasty?

Steven M. Kurtz PhD, Edmund C. Lau MS, Kevin L. Ong PhD, Edward M. Adler MD, Frank R. Kolisek MD, Michael T. Manley FRSA, PhD

The Affordable Care Act of 2010 advanced the economic model of bundled payments for total joint arthroplasty (TJA), in which hospitals will be financially responsible for readmissions, typically at 90 days after surgery. However, little is known about the financial burden of readmissions and what patient, clinical, and hospital factors drive readmission costs.

What Adverse Events and Injuries Are Cited in Anesthesia Malpractice Claims for Nonspine Orthopaedic Surgery?

Christopher D. Kent MD, Linda S. Stephens PhD, Karen L. Posner PhD, Karen B. Domino MD, MPH

Malpractice claims that arise during the perioperative care of patients receiving orthopaedic procedures will frequently involve both orthopaedic surgeons and anesthesiologists. The Anesthesia Closed Claims database contains anesthesia malpractice claim data that can be used to investigate patient safety events arising during the care of orthopaedic patients and can provide insight into the medicolegal liability shared by the two specialties.

What Is the Timing of General Health Adverse Events That Occur After Total Joint Arthroplasty?

Daniel D. Bohl MD, MPH, Nathaniel T. Ondeck BS, Bryce A. Basques MD, Brett R. Levine MD, Jonathan N. Grauer MD

Despite extensive research regarding risk factors for adverse events after total joint arthroplasty (TJA), there are few publications describing the timing at which such adverse events occur.

What Is the Diagnostic Accuracy of the Duck Walk Test in Detecting Meniscal Tears?

A. Post BSc, J. C. A. Noorduyn MSc, V. A. B. Scholtes PhD, E. L. A. R. Mutsaerts MD, PhD

Clinical weightbearing provocation tests, like the duck walk test, may be of value in diagnosing or screening for medial meniscal tears. However, evidence of the diagnostic accuracy of the duck walk test is lacking.

Current Total Knee Designs: Does Baseplate Roughness or Locking Mechanism Design Affect Polyethylene Backside Wear?

Zachary W. Sisko MD, Matthew G. Teeter PhD, Brent A. Lanting MD, MSc, FRCSC, James L. Howard MD, MSc, FRCSC, Richard W. McCalden MD, FRCSC, Douglas D. Naudie MD, FRCSC, Steven J. MacDonald MD, FRCSC, Edward M. Vasarhelyi MD, MSc, FRCSC

Tibial baseplate roughness and polyethylene-insert micromotion resulting from locking-mechanism loosening can lead to polyethylene backside wear in TKAs. However, many retrieval studies examining these variables have evaluated only older TKA implant designs.

Polyethylene Damage Increases With Varus Implant Alignment in Posterior-stabilized and Constrained Condylar Knee Arthroplasty

Zhichang Li MD, Christina I. Esposito PhD, Chelsea N. Koch BS, Yuo-yu Lee MS, Douglas E. Padgett MD, Timothy M. Wright PhD

Implant malalignment in primary TKA has been reported to increase stresses placed on the bearing surfaces of implant components. We used a longitudinally maintained registry coupled with an implant retrieval program to consider whether preoperative, postoperative, or prerevision malalignment was associated with increased risk of revision surgery after TKA.

Validation of the Chinese (Mandarin) Version of the Oxford Knee Score in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

Kai Lin BS, Liangxiao Bao BS, Jian Wang MD, Kimie Fujita PhD, Kiyoko Makimoto PhD, Xiaoyan Liao PhD

With the increasing number of patients with knee osteoarthritis undergoing TKAs in China, there is a clear need for a valid, short, joint-specific patient-reported outcome measure such as the Oxford Knee Score (OKS).

Current Pathologic Scoring Systems for Metal-on-metal THA Revisions are not Reproducible

Christiaan Smeekes MD, Arjen H. G. Cleven MD, PhD, Bart C. H. Wal MD, PhD, Stefan V. Dubois MD, Remigio W. Rouse MD, Bastiaan F. Ongkiehong MD, Ron Wolterbeek MD, Rob G. H. H. Nelissen MD, PhD

The aseptic lymphocyte vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL) score and the modified Oxford ALVAL score are frequently used scoring methods to evaluate the morphologic features of periprosthetic tissues around metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants. Except for the initial studies of these two morphology scoring methods, to our knowledge, no other studies have reported on intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values for interobserver reliability of these scoring methods.

Does the Risk of Rerevision Vary Between Porous Tantalum Cups and Other Cementless Designs After Revision Hip Arthroplasty?

Inari Laaksonen MD, PhD, Michelle Lorimer BSc, Kirill Gromov MD, PhD, Ola Rolfson MD, PhD, Keijo T. Mäkelä MD, PhD, Stephen E. Graves MD, DPhil, Henrik Malchau MD, PhD, Maziar Mohaddes MD, PhD

Earlier results with porous tantalum acetabular cups in revision THA generally have been favorable. Recently there has been some evidence presented that porous tantalum cups might decrease the risk of rerevision in the setting of revision hip surgery performed owing to prosthetic joint infection (PJI). As the data supporting this assertion come from a study with a limited study population, examining this issue with a large registry approach may be enlightening.

Alloy Microstructure Dictates Corrosion Modes in THA Modular Junctions

Robin Pourzal PhD, Deborah J. Hall BS, Jonas Ehrich BS, Stephanie M. McCarthy BS, Mathew T. Mathew PhD, Joshua J. Jacobs MD, Robert M. Urban

Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) triggered by corrosion products from modular taper junctions are a known cause of premature THA failure. CoCrMo devices are of particular concern because cobalt ions and chromium-orthophosphates were shown to be linked to ALTRs, even in metal-on-polyethylene THAs. The most common categories of CoCrMo alloy are cast and wrought alloy, which exhibit fundamental microstructural differences in terms of grain size and hard phases. The impact of implant alloy microstructure on the occurring modes of corrosion and subsequent metal ion release is not well understood.

Moving Forward Through Consensus: A Modified Delphi Approach to Determine the Top Research Priorities in Orthopaedic Oncology

Patricia Jacqueline Schneider BSc, Nathan Evaniew MD, PhD, Paula McKay BSc, Michelle Ghert MD

Several challenges presently impede the conduct of prospective clinical studies in orthopaedic oncology, including limited financial resources to support their associated costs and inadequate patient volume at most single institutions. This study was conducted to prioritize research questions within the field so that the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS), and other relevant professional societies, can direct the limited human and fiscal resources available to address the priorities that the stakeholders involved believe will have the most meaningful impact on orthopaedic oncology patient care.

Acetabular Reconstruction With Femoral Head Autograft After Intraarticular Resection of Periacetabular Tumors is Durable at Short-term Followup

Xiaodong Tang MD, Wei Guo MD, Rongli Yang MD, Taiqiang Yan MD, Shun Tang MD, Dasen Li MD

Pelvic reconstruction after periacetabular tumor resection is technically difficult and characterized by a high complication rate. Although endoprosthetic replacement can result in immediate postoperative functional recovery, biologic reconstructions with autograft may provide an enhanced prognosis in patients with long-term survival; however, little has been published regarding this approach. We therefore wished to evaluate whether whole-bulk femoral head autograft that is not contaminated by tumor can be used to reconstruct segmental bone defects after intraarticular resection of periacetabular tumors.

Immune Surveillance Plays a Role in Locally Aggressive Giant Cell Lesions of Bone

Ahmad Al-Sukaini MBChB, MRes, Francis J. Hornicek MD, PhD, Zachary S. Peacock DMD, MD, Leonard B. Kaban DMD, MD, Soldano Ferrone MD, PhD, Joseph H. Schwab MD, MS

Giant cell lesions are locally aggressive intraosseous neoplasms with capacity to metastasize. The role of immune surveillance in the pathophysiology of giant cell lesions is poorly understood, and understanding what role the immune system plays in giant cell lesions may lead to the development of more effective treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the role of immune surveillance in giant cell lesions by examining the expression of the HLA class I and class II antigens and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. In addition, we examined the role of the immune modulating surface antigen B7-H3, which belongs to the B7 superfamily, a group of molecules that modulates T-cell responses.

High Survivorship and Few Complications With Cementless Total Wrist Arthroplasty at a Mean Followup of 9 Years

Joseph A. Gil MD, Robin N. Kamal MD, Eugene Cone MD, Arnold-Peter C. Weiss MD

Total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) has been described as traditionally being performed with fixation in the radius and carpus with cement. The TWA implant used in our series has been associated with promising results in studies with up to 6 years followup; however, studies evaluating survivorship, pain, and function with this implant are limited.

Version Correction via Eccentric Reaming Compromises Remaining Bone Quality in B2 Glenoids: A Computational Study

Xiang Chen MS, Akhil S. Reddy BS, Andreas Kontaxis PhD, Daniel S. Choi MEng, Timothy Wright PhD, David M. Dines MD, Russell F. Warren MD, Julien Berhouet MD, Lawrence V. Gulotta MD

Version correction via eccentric reaming reduces clinically important retroversion in Walch type B2 glenoids (those with substantial glenoid retroversion and a second, sclerotic neoglenoid cavity) before total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). Clinically, an increased risk of glenoid component loosening in B2 glenoids was hypothesized to be the result of compromised glenoid bone quality attributable to eccentric reaming. However, no established guidelines exist regarding how much version correction can be applied without compromising the quality of glenoid bone.

Osteomyelitis Risk in Patients With Transfemoral Amputations Treated With Osseointegration Prostheses

Jonatan Tillander MD, Kerstin Hagberg RDT, PhD, Örjan Berlin MD, PhD, Lars Hagberg MD, PhD, Rickard Brånemark MD, PhD

Percutaneous anchoring of femoral amputation prostheses using osseointegrating titanium implants has been in use for more than 25 years. The method offers considerable advantages in daily life compared with conventional socket prostheses, however long-term success might be jeopardized by implant-associated infection, especially osteomyelitis, but the long-term risk of this complication is unknown.

Erratum to: Editorial: Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Belong on the Sidelines at American Football Games?

Seth S. Leopold MD, Matthew B. Dobbs MD, Mark C. Gebhardt MD, Terence J. Gioe MD, Clare M. Rimnac MD, Montri D. Wongworawat MD [object Object]
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