Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Published in
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®
Volume 475 | Issue 11 | Nov, 2017
Articles

Editorial: Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Belong on the Sidelines at American Football Games?

Seth S. Leopold MD, Matthew B. Dobbs MD, Mark C. Gebhardt MD, Terence J. Gioe MD, Clare M. Rimnac PhD, Montri D. Wongworawat MD

Increased Mortality After Prosthetic Joint Infection in Primary THA

Per Hviid Gundtoft MD, PhD, Alma Becic Pedersen MD, PhD, DMSc, Claus Varnum MD, PhD, Søren Overgaard MD, DMSc

Revision for prosthetic joint infection (PJI) has a major effect on patients’ health but it remains unclear if early PJI after primary THA is associated with a high mortality.

Medicolegal Sidebar: (Mis)Informed Consent in Medical Negligence Lawsuits

Wendy Z. W. Teo BA(Cantab), BM BCh (Oxon), LLM, Lawrence H. Brenner JD, B. Sonny Bal MD, JD, MBA, PhD

Are Barbed Sutures Associated With 90-day Reoperation Rates After Primary TKA?

Daniel C. Austin MD, Benjamin J. Keeney PhD, Brendan E. Dempsey MS, Karl M. Koenig MD, MS

Studies have suggested that barbed sutures for wound closure in TKAs are an acceptable alternative to standard methods. However others have observed a higher risk of wound-related complications with barbed sutures.

Are TKAs Performed in High-volume Hospitals Less Likely to Undergo Revision Than TKAs Performed in Low-volume Hospitals?

Elke Jeschke PhD, Mustafa Citak MD, PhD, Christian Günster, Andreas Matthias Halder MD, Karl-Dieter Heller MD, Jürgen Malzahn MD, Fritz Uwe Niethard MD, Peter Schräder MD, Josef Zacher MD, Thorsten Gehrke MD

High-volume hospitals have achieved better outcomes for THAs and unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKAs). However, few studies have analyzed implant survival after primary TKA in high-volume centers.

Brain Activity Changes in Somatosensory and Emotion-Related Areas With Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Deficiency

Masaru Kadowaki MD, Taku Tadenuma MD, Nobuyuki Kumahashi MD, PhD, Yuji Uchio MD, PhD

Patellar instability with medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) deficiency is a common sports injury among young people. Although nonoperative and surgical treatment can provide stability of the patella, patients often have anxiety related to the knee. We speculate that neural dysfunction may be related to anxiety in these patients; however, the mechanism in the brain that generates this anxiety remains unknown.

What Should Define Preoperative Anemia in Primary THA?

Mitchell R. Klement MD, Ashwin Peres-Da-Silva BS, Brian T. Nickel MD, Cynthia L. Green PhD, Samuel S. Wellman MD, David E. Attarian MD, Michael P. Bolognesi MD, Thorsten M. Seyler MD, PhD

The use of tranexamic acid (TXA) in THA decreases the risk of transfusion after surgery. However, nearly 10% of patients still undergo a transfusion, which has been independently associated with an increased risk of complications. Preoperative anemia has been proven to be a strong predictor of transfusion after THA, but the ideal “cutoff” values in today’s population that maximize sensitivity and specificity to predict transfusion have yet to be established.

What Are the Risk Factors and Complications Associated With Intraoperative and Postoperative Fractures in Total Wrist Arthroplasty?

Eric R. Wagner MD, MS, Jason J. Srnec MD, Kapil Mehrotra MD, Marco Rizzo MD

Total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) can relieve pain and preserve some wrist motion in patients with advanced wrist arthritis. However, few studies have evaluated the risks and outcomes associated with periprosthetic fractures around TWAs.

What Demographic and Clinical Characteristics Correlate With Expectations With Trapeziometacarpal Arthritis?

Lana Kang MD, MSc, Joseph Nguyen MPH, Sohaib Z. Hashmi MD, Steve K. Lee MD, Andrew J. Weiland MD, Carol A. Mancuso MD

Pretreatment variables have been shown to be associated with the fulfillment of patient expectations, yet in treating thumb trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis (OA) it remains unclear how patient expectations correlate with the effectiveness of treatment. An increased understanding of the variables that affect patient expectations enables tailored patient education and patient-provider communication.

Revision to Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Restores Stability for Patients With Unstable Shoulder Prostheses

Nicholas M. Hernandez MD, Brian P. Chalmers MD, Eric R. Wagner MD, John W. Sperling MD, Robert H. Cofield MD, Joaquin Sanchez-Sotelo MD, PhD

Instability after shoulder arthroplasty remains a complication with limited salvage options. Reoperation for instability with anatomic designs has led to high rates of persistent instability, therefore we aimed to evaluate the use of RSA for treatment of prosthetic instability.

Does Postoperative Glenoid Retroversion Affect the 2-Year Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes for Total Shoulder Arthroplasty?

Benjamin C. Service MD, Jason E. Hsu MD, Jeremy S. Somerson MD, Stacy M. Russ BA, Frederick A. Matsen MD

While glenoid retroversion and posterior humeral head decentering are common preoperative features of severely arthritic glenohumeral joints, the relationship of postoperative glenoid component retroversion to the clinical results of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) is unclear. Studies have indicated concern for inferior outcomes when glenoid components are inserted in 15° or more retroversion.

What Are the Complications, Survival, and Outcomes After Revision to Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty in Patients Older Than 80 Years?

Eduard Alentorn-Geli MD, Nicholas J. Clark MD, Andrew T. Assenmacher MD, Brian T. Samuelsen MD, Joaquín Sánchez-Sotelo MD, Robert H. Cofield MD, John W. Sperling MD

By the time patients with a failed shoulder arthroplasty require revision surgery, a substantial number are older than 80 years. The risk of complications of revision arthroplasty in this elderly population is largely unknown and needs to be considered when contemplating whether these patients are too frail for revision surgery.

What is the Rate of Revision Discectomies After Primary Discectomy on a National Scale?

Sohrab S. Virk MD, MBA, Ashish Diwan PhD, FRACS, FAOrthA, Frank M. Phillips MD, Harvinder Sandhu MD, Safdar N. Khan MD

Lumbar discectomy has been shown to be clinically beneficial in numerous studies for appropriately selected patients. Some patients, however, undergo revision discectomy, with previously reported estimates of revisions ranging from 5.1% to 7.9%. No study to date has been able to precisely quantify the rate of revision surgery over numerous years on a national scale.

What is the Difference in Morphologic Features of the Thoracic Pedicle Between Patients With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis and Healthy Subjects? A CT-based Case-control Study

Bo Gao MD, Wenjie Gao MD, Chong Chen MD, Qinghua Wang MM, Shaochun Lin MM, Caixia Xu PhD, Dongsheng Huang MD, Peiqiang Su MD

Describing the morphologic features of the thoracic pedicle in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is necessary for placement of pedicle screws. Previous studies showed inadequate reliability owing to small sample size and heterogeneity of the patients surveyed.

PROMIS Pain Interference and Physical Function Scores Correlate With the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) in Patients With Hallux Valgus

Devon C. Nixon MD, Jeremy J. McCormick MD, Jeffrey E. Johnson MD, Sandra E. Klein MD

Traditional patient-reported outcome instruments like the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) quantify patient disability but often are limited by responder burden and incomplete questionnaires. The Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) overcomes such obstacles through computer-adaptive technology and can capture outcome data from various domains including physical and psychosocial function. Prior work has compared the FAAM with PROMIS physical function; however, there is little evidence comparing the association between foot and ankle-specific tools like the FAAM with more general outcomes measures of PROMIS pain interference and depression in foot and ankle conditions.

Severe Hemorrhagic Shock Leads to a Delayed Fracture Healing and Decreased Bone Callus Strength in a Mouse Model

Katrin Bundkirchen MS, Christian Macke MD, Janin Reifenrath PhD, Luisa Marilena Schäck PhD, Sandra Noack PhD, Borna Relja PhD, Philipp Naber MS, Bastian Welke PhD, Michael Fehr VMD, Christian Krettek MD, Claudia Neunaber PhD

Multiple trauma is frequently associated with hemorrhagic shock and fractures of the extremities. Clinically, the rate of impaired fracture healing (delayed healing and nonunion) seems to be increased in patients with multiple injuries compared with patients with isolated fractures. As the underlying pathogenesis remains poorly understood, we aimed to analyze the biomechanical properties during fracture healing in a murine model.

How Long Does Antimycobacterial Antibiotic-loaded Bone Cement Have In Vitro Activity for Musculoskeletal Tuberculosis?

Jae Hoo Lee MD, Chang Dong Han MD, PhD, Sang-Nae Cho DVM, PhD, Ick Hwan Yang MD, PhD, Woo Suk Lee MD, PhD, Seung-Hun Baek PhD, Jae Won Shin MD, Khalid Elfadil Ibrahim Husein MD, Kwan Kyu Park MD, PhD

Antibiotic-loaded bone cement is accepted as an effective treatment modality for musculoskeletal tuberculosis. However, comparative information regarding combinations and concentrations of second-line antimycobacterial drugs, such as streptomycin and amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, are lacking.

What Factors are Associated With 90-day Episode-of-care Payments for Younger Patients With Total Joint Arthroplasty?

Shweta Pathak PhD, Cecilia M. Ganduglia MD, DrPH, Samir S. Awad MD, MPH, Wenyaw Chan PhD, John M. Swint PhD, Robert O. Morgan PhD

Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) has been identified as a procedure with substantial variations in inpatient and postacute care payments. Most studies in this area have focused primarily on the Medicare population and rarely have characterized the younger commercially insured populations. Understanding the inpatient and postdischarge care service-component differences across 90-day episodes of care and factors associated with payments for younger patients is crucial for successful implementation of bundled payments in TJA in non-Medicare populations.

Reply to the Letter to the Editor: False-positive Cultures After Native Knee Aspiration: True or False

Jason M. Jennings MD, DPT, Douglas A. Dennis MD, Raymond H. Kim MD, Todd M. Miner MD, Charlie C. Yang MD, David C. McNabb MD

Erratum to: What Demographic and Clinical Characteristics Correlate With Expectations With Trapeziometacarpal Arthritis?

Lana Kang MD, MSc, Joseph Nguyen MPH, Sohaib Z. Hashmi MD, Steve K. Lee MD, Andrew J. Weiland MD, Carol A. Mancuso MD
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