Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Published in
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®
Volume 475 | Issue 10 | Oct, 2017
Articles

Patients Older Than 40 Years With Unilateral Occupational Claims for New Shoulder and Knee Symptoms Have Bilateral MRI Changes

Tiffany C. Liu BA, Nina Leung PhD, Leonard Edwards BS, David Ring MD, PhD, Edward Bernacki MD, MPH, Melissa D. Tonn MD, MBA, MPH

Minor events that occur in the workplace sometimes are evaluated with MRI, which may reveal age-related changes in the symptomatic body part. These age-related changes are often ascribed to the event. However, evidence of similar or worse pathophysiology in the contralateral joint would suggest that the symptoms might be new, but the pathophysiology is not.

Art in Science: The Artist and The Disease: The Exemplary Cases of Renoir and Toulouse-Lautrec

Berardo Di Matteo MD, Vittorio Tarabella MA, Giuseppe Filardo MD, PhD, Piergiuseppe Tanzi MD, Elizaveta Kon MD, Francesco Iacono MD, Maurilio Marcacci MD

Knee Abduction Affects Greater Magnitude of Change in ACL and MCL Strains Than Matched Internal Tibial Rotation In Vitro

Nathaniel A. Bates PhD, Rebecca J. Nesbitt PhD, Jason T. Shearn PhD, Gregory D. Myer PhD, Timothy E. Hewett PhD

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injures incur over USD 2 billion in annual medical costs and prevention has become a topic of interest in biomechanics. However, literature conflicts persist over how knee rotations contribute to ACL strain and ligament injury. To maximize the efficacy of ACL injury prevention, the effects of underlying mechanics need to be better understood.

Rotational Laxity Control by the Anterolateral Ligament and the Lateral Meniscus Is Dependent on Knee Flexion Angle: A Cadaveric Biomechanical Study

Timothy Lording FRACS, Gillian Corbo BSc, Dianne Bryant PhD, Timothy A. Burkhart PhD, Alan Getgood MD

Injury to the anterolateral ligament (ALL) has been reported to contribute to high-grade anterolateral laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Failure to address ALL injury has been suggested as a cause of persistent rotational laxity after ACL reconstruction. Lateral meniscus posterior root (LMPR) tears have also been shown to cause increased internal rotation of the knee.

What Factors Influence the Biomechanical Properties of Allograft Tissue for ACL Reconstruction? A Systematic Review

Drew A. Lansdown MD, Andrew J. Riff MD, Molly Meadows MD, Adam B. Yanke MD, Bernard R. Bach MD

Allograft tissue is used in 22% to 42% of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. Clinical outcomes have been inconsistent with allograft tissue, with some series reporting no differences in outcomes and others reporting increased risk of failure. There are numerous variations in processing and preparation that may influence the eventual performance of allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction. We sought to perform a systematic review to summarize the factors that affect the biomechanical properties of allograft tissue for use in ACL reconstruction. Many factors might impact the biomechanical properties of allograft tissue, and these should be understood when considering using allograft tissue or when reporting outcomes from allograft reconstruction.

Variations in Knee Kinematics After ACL Injury and After Reconstruction Are Correlated With Bone Shape Differences

Drew A. Lansdown MD, Valentina Pedoia PhD, Musa Zaid MD, Keiko Amano MD, Richard B. Souza PT, PhD, Xiaojuan Li PhD, C. Benjamin Ma MD

The factors that contribute to the abnormal knee kinematics after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and ACL reconstruction remain unclear. Bone shape has been implicated in the development of hip and knee osteoarthritis, although there is little knowledge about the effects of bone shape on knee kinematics after ACL injury and after ACL reconstruction.

High Interspecimen Variability in Engagement of the Anterolateral Ligament: An In Vitro Cadaveric Study

Robert N. Kent BSE, James F. Boorman-Padgett BS, Ran Thein MD, Jelle P. List MD, Danyal H. Nawabi MD, Thomas L. Wickiewicz MD, Carl W. Imhauser PhD, Andrew D. Pearle MD

Anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction as an adjunct to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains a subject of clinical debate. This uncertainty may be driven in part by a lack of knowledge regarding where, within the range of knee motion, the ALL begins to carry force (engages).

Does the FIFA 11+ Injury Prevention Program Reduce the Incidence of ACL Injury in Male Soccer Players?

Holly J. Silvers-Granelli MPT, Mario Bizzini PhD, MSC, PT, Amelia Arundale DPT, Bert R. Mandelbaum MD, Lynn Snyder-Mackler PT, ScD

The FIFA 11+ injury prevention program has been shown to decrease the risk of soccer injuries in men and women. The program has also been shown to decrease time loss resulting from injury. However, previous studies have not specifically investigated how the program might impact the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in male soccer players.

Hamstring Autograft versus Patellar Tendon Autograft for ACL Reconstruction: Is There a Difference in Graft Failure Rate? A Meta-analysis of 47,613 Patients

Brian T. Samuelsen MD, MBA, Kate E. Webster PhD, Nick R. Johnson BS, Timothy E. Hewett PhD, Aaron J. Krych MD

Bone-patellar tendon-bone (bone-tendon-bone) and four-strand hamstring tendon grafts (hamstring) are the most commonly utilized autografts for primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Existing clinical trials, registry studies, and meta-analyses offer conflicting opinions regarding the most favorable graft choice.

Younger Patients and Men Achieve Higher Outcome Scores Than Older Patients and Women After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

Kate E. Webster PhD, Julian A. Feller FRACS

There is some evidence that functional performance and validated outcome scores differ according to the gender, age, and sport participation status of a patient after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, the impact of these three factors, and interaction among them, has not been studied across a large relatively homogeneous group of patients to better elucidate their impact.

What Is the Mid-term Failure Rate of Revision ACL Reconstruction? A Systematic Review

Alberto Grassi MD, Christopher Kim MD, Giulio Maria Marcheggiani Muccioli MD, Stefano Zaffagnini MD, Annunziato Amendola MD

When anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction fails, a revision procedure may be performed to improve knee function, correct instability, and allow return to activities. The results of revision ACL reconstruction have been reported to produce good but inferior patient-reported and objective outcomes compared with primary ACL reconstruction, but the degree to which this is the case varies widely among published studies and may be influenced by heterogeneity of patients, techniques, and endpoints assessed. For those reasons, a systematic review may provide important insights.

Risk of Revision Was Not Reduced by a Double-bundle ACL Reconstruction Technique: Results From the Scandinavian Registers

Cathrine Aga MD, Jüri-Tomas Kartus MD, PhD, Martin Lind MD, PhD, Stein Håkon Låstad Lygre PhD, Lars-Petter Granan MD, PhD, Lars Engebretsen MD, PhD

Double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has demonstrated improved biomechanical properties and moderately better objective outcomes compared with single-bundle reconstructions. This could make an impact on the rerupture rate and reduce the risk of revisions in patients undergoing double-bundle ACL reconstruction compared with patients reconstructed with a traditional single-bundle technique. The National Knee Ligament Registers in Scandinavia provide information that can be used to evaluate the revision outcome after ACL reconstructions.

Report of the Primary Outcomes for Gait Mechanics in Men of the ACL-SPORTS Trial: Secondary Prevention With and Without Perturbation Training Does Not Restore Gait Symmetry in Men 1 or 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction

Jacob John Capin PT, DPT, MS, Ryan Zarzycki PT, DPT, Amelia Arundale PT, DPT, SCS, Kathleen Cummer PT, PhD, DPT, Lynn Snyder-Mackler PT, ScD, FAPTA

Movement asymmetries during walking are common after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction and may influence the early development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. Preoperative neuromuscular training (like perturbation training, which is neuromuscular training requiring selective muscle activation in response to surface perturbations) improves gait asymmetries and functional outcomes among people who are ACL-deficient, but the effect of postoperative perturbation training on gait mechanics after ACL reconstruction is unknown.

Report of the Clinical and Functional Primary Outcomes in Men of the ACL-SPORTS Trial: Similar Outcomes in Men Receiving Secondary Prevention With and Without Perturbation Training 1 and 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction

Amelia J. H. Arundale PT, DPT, Kathleen Cummer PT, DPT, Jacob J. Capin PT, DPT, MS, Ryan Zarzycki PT, DPT, Lynn Snyder-Mackler PT, ATC, ScD

Athletes often are cleared to return to activities 6 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction; however, knee function measures continue to improve up to 2 years after surgery. Interventions beyond standard care may facilitate successful return to preinjury activities and improve functional outcomes. Perturbation training has been used in nonoperative ACL injury and preoperative ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, but has not been examined in postoperative ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, specifically return to sport rehabilitation.

What Factors Predict Conversion to THA After Arthroscopy?

John M. Redmond MD, Asheesh Gupta MD, Kevin Dunne BA, Ammar Humayun MBBS, Leslie C. Yuen BA, Benjamin G. Domb MD

Failure of hip preservation to alleviate symptoms potentially subjects the patient to reoperation or conversion surgery to THA, adding recovery time, risk, and cost. A risk calculator using an algorithm that can predict the likelihood that a patient who undergoes arthroscopic hip surgery will undergo THA within 2 years would be helpful, but to our knowledge, no such tool exists.

Is the Clavicula Pro Humero Technique of Value for Reconstruction After Resection of the Proximal Humerus in Children?

Dominique Barbier MD, Benoît Billy MD, Philippe Gicquel MD, Sophie Bourelle MD, Pierre Journeau MD

There are several options for reconstruction of proximal humerus resections after wide resection for malignant tumors in children. The clavicula pro humero technique is a biologic option that has been used in the past, but there are only scant case reports and small series that comment on the results of the procedure. Because the longevity of children mandates a reconstruction with potential longevity not likely to be achieved by other techniques, the clavicula pro humero technique may be a potential option in selected patients.

Does Humeral Component Lateralization in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Affect Rotator Cuff Torque? Evaluation in a Cadaver Model

Kevin Chan MD, MSc, FRCSC, G. Daniel G. Langohr PhD, Matthew Mahaffy BESc, James A. Johnson PhD, George S. Athwal MD, FRCSC

Humeral component lateralization in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) may improve the biomechanical advantage of the rotator cuff, which could improve the torque generated by the rotator cuff and increase internal and external rotation of the shoulder.

The Effect of Surgical Technique and Spacer Texture on Bone Regeneration: A Caprine Study Using the Masquelet Technique

Viviane Luangphakdy MS, G. Elizabeth Pluhar DVM, PhD, Nicolás S. Piuzzi MD, Jean-Claude D’Alleyrand MD, Cathy S. Carlson DVM, PhD, Joan E. Bechtold PhD, Jonathan Forsberg MD, PhD, George F. Muschler MD

The Masquelet-induced-membrane technique is a commonly used method for treating segmental bone defects. However, there are no established clinical standards for management of the induced membrane before grafting.

Is Dual Semitendinosus Allograft Stronger Than Turndown for Achilles Tendon Reconstruction? An In Vitro Analysis

Michael C. Aynardi MD, Lara C. Atwater MD, Roshan Melvani MD, Brent G. Parks MD, Adrian G. Paez BS, Stuart D. Miller MD

Large Achilles tendon defects pose a treatment challenge. The standard treatment with a turndown flap requires a large extensile incision, puts the sural nerve at risk, and demands slow, careful rehabilitation. Dual allograft semitendinosus reconstruction is a new clinical alternative that has the theoretical advantages of a smaller incision, less dissection, and a stronger construct that may allow for faster rehabilitation.

Are There Differences in Gait Mechanics in Patients With A Fixed Versus Mobile Bearing Total Ankle Arthroplasty? A Randomized Trial

Robin M. Queen PhD, Christopher T. Franck PhD, Daniel Schmitt PhD, Samuel B. Adams PhD

Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is an alternative to arthrodesis, but no randomized trial has examined whether a fixed bearing or mobile bearing implant provides improved gait mechanics.

Erratum to: High Interspecimen Variability in Engagement of the Anterolateral Ligament: An In Vitro Cadaveric Study

Robert N. Kent BSE, James F. Boorman-Padgett BS, Ran Thein MD, Jelle P. List MD, Danyal H. Nawabi MD, Thomas L. Wickiewicz MD, Carl W. Imhauser PhD, Andrew D. Pearle MD
Back to top