Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Tumor 239 articles

Articles

Supplemental Bone Grafting in Giant Cell Tumor of the Extremity Reduces Nononcologic Complications

Joseph Benevenia MD, Steven M. Rivero MD, Jeffrey Moore MD, Joseph A. Ippolito BA, Daniel A. Siegerman MD, Kathleen S. Beebe MD, Francis R. Patterson MD

Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are treated with resection curettage and adjuvants followed by stabilization. Complications include recurrence, fracture, and joint degeneration. Studies have shown treatment with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) may increase the risk of joint degeneration and fracture. Other studies have suggested that subchondral bone grafting may reduce these risks.

Reconstruction After Hemipelvectomy With the Ice-Cream Cone Prosthesis: What Are the Short-term Clinical Results?

Irene Barrientos-Ruiz MD, Eduardo José Ortiz-Cruz MD, Manuel Peleteiro-Pensado MD

Reconstruction after internal hemipelvectomy resection likely provides better function than hindquarter amputation. However, many reconstruction methods have been used, complications with these approaches are common, and function often is poor; because of these issues, it seems important to investigate alternative implants and surgical techniques.

Do Patients After Chondrosarcoma Treatment Have Age-appropriate Bone Mineral Density in the Long Term?

Gerhard M. Hobusch MD, Thomas M. Tiefenboeck MD, Janina Patsch MD, Christoph Krall MD, Gerold Holzer MD

In long-term survivors of osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma treated with the addition of radio- and chemotherapy, low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures have been observed, presumably resulting from these adjuvants. Because patients with chondrosarcoma usually are not treated with conventional adjuvant treatment, observation of low BMD in patients with chondrosarcoma presumably would be the result of other mechanisms. However, BMD in patients with a history of chondrosarcoma has not been well characterized.

Is Prophylactic Intervention More Cost-effective Than the Treatment of Pathologic Fractures in Metastatic Bone Disease?

Alan T. Blank MD, MS, Daniel M. Lerman MD, Neeraj M. Patel MD, MPH, Timothy B. Rapp MD

Metastatic bone disease is a substantial burden to patients and the healthcare system as a whole. Metastatic disease can be painful, is associated with decreased survival, and is emotionally traumatic to patients when they discover their disease has progressed. In the United States, more than 250,000 patients have metastatic bone disease, with an estimated annual cost of USD 12 billion. Prior studies suggest that patients who receive prophylactic fixation for impending pathologic fractures, compared with those treated for realized pathologic fractures, have decreased pain levels, faster postoperative rehabilitation, and less in-hospital morbidity. However, to our knowledge, the relative economic utility of these treatment options has not been examined.

Is Needle Biopsy Clinically Useful in Preoperative Grading of Central Chondrosarcoma of the Pelvis and Long Bones?

Pablo D. Roitman MD, Germán L. Farfalli MD, Miguel A. Ayerza MD, D. Luis Múscolo MD, Federico E. Milano MSC, Luis A. Aponte-Tinao MD

Central chondrosarcoma of bone is graded on a scale of 1 to 3 according to histological criteria. Clinically, these tumors can be divided into low-grade (Grade 1) and high-grade (Grade 2, Grade 3, and dedifferentiated) chondrosarcomas. Although en bloc resection has been the most widely used treatment, it has become generally accepted that in selected patients with low-grade chondrosarcomas of long bones, curettage is safe and effective. This approach requires an accurate preoperative estimation of grade to avoid under- or overtreatment, but prior reports have indicated that both imaging and biopsy do not always give an accurate prediction of grade.

What Are the Functional Outcomes After Total Sacrectomy Without Spinopelvic Reconstruction?

Piya Kiatisevi MD, Chaiwat Piyaskulkaew MD, Sombat Kunakornsawat MD, Bhasanan Sukunthanak MD

After total sacrectomy, many types of spinopelvic reconstruction have been described with good functional results. However, complications associated with reconstruction are not uncommon and usually result in further surgical interventions. Moreover, less is known about patient function after total sacrectomy without spinopelvic reconstruction, which may be indicated when malignant or aggressive benign bone and soft tissue tumors involved the entire sacrum.

What Happens to the Articular Surface After Curettage for Epiphyseal Chondroblastoma? A Report on Functional Results, Arthritis, and Arthroplasty

Germán L. Farfalli MD, Pablo A. I. Slullitel MD, D. Luis Muscolo MD, Miguel A. Ayerza MD, Luis A. Aponte-Tinao MD

Chondroblastoma is an uncommon, benign, but locally aggressive bone tumor that occurs in the apophyses or epiphyses of long bones, primarily in young patients. Although some are treated with large resections, aggressive curettage and bone grafting are more commonly performed to preserve the involved joint. Such intralesional resection may result in damage to the growth plate and articular cartilage, which can result in painful arthritis. Prior studies have focused primarily on oncologic outcomes rather than long-term joint status and functional outcomes.

Antibacterial and Biocompatible Titanium-Copper Oxide Coating May Be a Potential Strategy to Reduce Periprosthetic Infection: An In Vitro Study

German A. Norambuena MD, Robin Patel MD, Melissa Karau MT, Cody C. Wyles BS, Paul J. Jannetto PhD, Kevin E. Bennet BSChE, MBA, Arlen D. Hanssen MD, Rafael J. Sierra MD

Periprosthetic infections are devastating for patients and more efficacious preventive strategies are needed. Surface-modified implants using antibacterial coatings represent an option to cope with this problem; however, manufacturing limitations and cytotoxicity have curbed clinical translation. Among metals with antibacterial properties, copper has shown superior in vitro antibacterial performance while maintaining an acceptable cytotoxicity profile. A thin film containing copper could prevent early biofilm formation to limit periprosthetic infections. This pilot study presents the in vitro antibacterial effect, cytotoxicity, and copper ion elution pattern of a thin film of titanium-copper oxide (TiCuO).

How Much Clinical and Functional Impairment do Children Treated With Knee Rotationplasty Experience in Adulthood?

Maria Grazia Benedetti MD, Yusuke Okita PT, PhD, Elena Recubini MD, Elisabetta Mariani MD, Alberto Leardini PhD, Marco Manfrini MD

Rotationplasty may be indicated for some children with osteosarcoma in the distal femur or proximal tibia; in properly selected patients, it may offer functional advantages over transfemoral amputation and more durable results than a prosthesis. The clinical and functional outcomes reported for this procedure generally have been limited to studies with a mean followup of approximately 8 years in terms of Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Score (MSTS), physical examination, and gait analysis. However, the effects of residual thigh-shank length on gait have not been explored to our knowledge.

What Are the Long-term Results of MUTARS® Modular Endoprostheses for Reconstruction of Tumor Resection of the Distal Femur and Proximal Tibia?

Michaël P. A. Bus MSc, Michiel A. J. Sande MD, PhD, Marta Fiocco PhD, Gerard R. Schaap MD, PhD, Jos A. M. Bramer MD, PhD, P. D. Sander Dijkstra MD, PhD

Modular endoprostheses are commonly used to reconstruct defects of the distal femur and proximal tibia after bone tumor resection. Because limb salvage surgery for bone sarcomas is relatively new, becoming more frequently used since the 1980s, studies focusing on the long-term results of such prostheses in treatment of primary tumors are scarce.