Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Tumor 246 articles

Articles

Aneurysmal Bone Cysts: Do Simple Treatments Work?

Krishna I. A. Reddy MCh (Orth), FRCSEd (Orth), F. Sinnaeve MD, Czar Louie Gaston MD, Robert J. Grimer FRCS, Simon R. Carter FRCS

Primary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are benign, expansile bone lesions commonly treated with aggressive curettage with or without adjuvants such as cryotherapy, methacrylate cement, or phenol. It has been reported that occasionally these lesions heal spontaneously or after a pathologic fracture, and we observed that some ABCs treated at our center healed after biopsy alone. Because of this, we introduced a novel biopsy technique we call “curopsy,” which is a percutaneous limited curettage at the time of biopsy, obtaining the lining membrane from various quadrants of the cyst leading to consolidation (curopsy = biopsy with intention to cure).

Painful Forearm Mass in a 75-year-old Man

Scott J. Schoenleber MD, Andrew E. Rosenberg MD, H. Thomas Temple MD

Does Intensity of Surveillance Affect Survival After Surgery for Sarcomas? Results of a Randomized Noninferiority Trial

Ajay Puri MS, Ashish Gulia MS, Rohini Hawaldar PhD, Priya Ranganathan MD, Rajendra A. Badwe MS

Whether current postoperative surveillance regimes result in improved overall survival (OS) of patients with extremity sarcomas is unknown.

Radiographic Classification of Coronal Plane Femoral Deformities in Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia

Ernesto Ippolito MD, Pasquale Farsetti MD, Alison M. Boyce MD, Alessandro Corsi MD, Fernando Maio MD, Michael T. Collins MD

Fibrous dysplasia of bone is a skeletal dysplasia with a propensity to affect the femur in its polyostotic form, leading to deformity, fracture, and pain. The proximal femur is most commonly involved with a tendency to distal progression, thereby producing the typical shepherd’s crook deformity. However, there are few data on the spectrum and progression of femoral deformities in polyostotic fibrous dysplasia.

Does Ifosfamide Therapy Improve Survival of Patients With Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma?

Satoshi Kawaguchi MD, Tao Sun MD, Patrick P. Lin MD, Michael Deavers MD, Nusrat Harun PhD, Valerae O. Lewis MD

Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma remains a significant therapeutic challenge. Studies performed to date have not identified efficacious chemotherapy regimens for this disease.

What Are the Levels of Evidence on Which We Base Decisions for Surgical Management of Lower Extremity Bone Tumors?

Nathan Evaniew MD, James Nuttall MBBChBAO, Forough Farrokhyar MPhil, PhD, Mohit Bhandari MD, PhD, Michelle Ghert MD

Benign and malignant lower extremity primary bone tumors are among the least common conditions treated by orthopaedic surgeons. The literature supporting their surgical management has historically been in the form of observational studies rather than prospective controlled studies. Observational studies are prone to confounding bias, sampling bias, and recall bias.

Adverse Reactions of Artificial Bone Graft Substitutes: Lessons Learned From Using Tricalcium Phosphate geneX®

Joerg Friesenbichler MD, Werner Maurer-Ertl MD, Patrick Sadoghi MD, Ulrike Pirker-Fruehauf MD, Koppany Bodo MD, Andreas Leithner MD

Artificial bone graft substitutes are widely used to fill bony defects after curettage of benign tumors. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of one such bone graft substitute, geneX, which contains tricalcium phosphate and calcium sulphate; however, during the course of this study we observed a high number of complications.

Infection After Surgical Resection for Pelvic Bone Tumors: An Analysis of 270 Patients From One Institution

Andrea Angelini MD, Gabriele Drago MD, Giulia Trovarelli MD, Teresa Calabrò MD, Pietro Ruggieri MD, PhD

Surgical treatment of pelvic tumors with or without acetabular involvement is challenging. Primary goals of surgery include local control and maintenance of good quality of life, but the procedures are marked by significant perioperative morbidity and complications.

Validation of the Brazilian Version of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Rating Scale for Lower Extremity Bone Sarcoma

Daniel Cesar Seguel Rebolledo MD, João Ricardo Nickenig Vissoci MD, Ricardo Pietrobon MD, PhD, Olavo Pires Camargo MD, PhD, Andre Mathias Baptista MD, PhD

The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) rating scale is an English-language instrument used worldwide to assess functional evaluation of patients with musculoskeletal cancer. Despite its use in several studies in English-speaking countries, its validity for assessing patients in other languages is unknown. The translation and validation of widely used scales can facilitate the comparison across international patient samples.