Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Tumor 241 articles

Articles

Estimated Cause-specific Survival Continues to Improve Over Time in Patients With Chondrosarcoma

Kyle R. Duchman MD, Charles F. Lynch MD, MS, PhD, Joseph A. Buckwalter MD, MS, Benjamin J. Miller MD, MS

Conditional survival measures change in the risk of mortality given that a patient has survived a defined period of time. This has yet to be reported for chondrosarcoma of bone. This information should be of interest to the clinician and helpful in counseling patients with chondrosarcoma.

Multilevel En Bloc Spondylectomy for Tumors of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Is Challenging But Rewarding

Alessandro Davide Luzzati MD, Sambhav Shah MS, Fabio Gagliano MD, Giuseppe Perrucchini MD, Gennaro Scotto MD, Marco Alloisio MD

Over the years, en bloc spondylectomy has proven its efficacy in controlling spinal tumors and improving survival rates. However, there are few reports of large series that critically evaluate the results of multilevel en bloc spondylectomies for spinal neoplasms.

Frequent Complications and Severe Bone Loss Associated With the Repiphysis Expandable Distal Femoral Prosthesis

Cara A. Cipriano MD, Irina S. Gruzinova BS, Rachel M. Frank MD, Steven Gitelis MD, Walter W. Virkus MD

The treatment of choice for distal femur malignancies in skeletally immature patients remains controversial. An expandable endoprosthesis device (Repiphysis Limb Salvage System; Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN, USA) allows for limb preservation and noninvasive lengthening but has been associated with significant complications; however, the extent and implications of bone loss associated with this implant have not been reported.

Is Surgery for Brachial Plexus Schwannomas Safe and Effective?

Hyuk Jin Lee MD, Jeong Hwan Kim MD, Seung Hwan Rhee MD, Hyun Sik Gong MD, Goo Hyun Baek MD, PhD

Schwannomas rarely are found in the brachial plexus, and although they are benign, they present significant challenges to surgical treatment. To our knowledge, there are few studies investigating the surgical outcomes of patients with brachial plexus tumors.

Proximal Tumor Location and Fluid-fluid Levels on MRI Predict Resistance to Chemotherapy in Stage IIB Osteosarcoma

Dae-Geun Jeon MD, Won Seok Song MD, Wan Hyeong Cho MD, Chang-Bae Kong MD, Sang Hyun Cho MD

Primary tumor growth during neoadjuvant chemotherapy is believed to be a sign of resistance to chemotherapy (chemoresistance), and often is associated with poor histologic response, local recurrence, and poorer survival. Currently there are no proven indicators to predict poor response to chemotherapy at the time of diagnosis.

Aneurysmal Bone Cysts: Do Simple Treatments Work?

Krishna I. A. Reddy MCh (Orth), FRCSEd (Orth), F. Sinnaeve MD, Czar Louie Gaston MD, Robert J. Grimer FRCS, Simon R. Carter FRCS

Primary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are benign, expansile bone lesions commonly treated with aggressive curettage with or without adjuvants such as cryotherapy, methacrylate cement, or phenol. It has been reported that occasionally these lesions heal spontaneously or after a pathologic fracture, and we observed that some ABCs treated at our center healed after biopsy alone. Because of this, we introduced a novel biopsy technique we call “curopsy,” which is a percutaneous limited curettage at the time of biopsy, obtaining the lining membrane from various quadrants of the cyst leading to consolidation (curopsy = biopsy with intention to cure).

Painful Forearm Mass in a 75-year-old Man

Scott J. Schoenleber MD, Andrew E. Rosenberg MD, H. Thomas Temple MD

Does Intensity of Surveillance Affect Survival After Surgery for Sarcomas? Results of a Randomized Noninferiority Trial

Ajay Puri MS, Ashish Gulia MS, Rohini Hawaldar PhD, Priya Ranganathan MD, Rajendra A. Badwe MS

Whether current postoperative surveillance regimes result in improved overall survival (OS) of patients with extremity sarcomas is unknown.

Radiographic Classification of Coronal Plane Femoral Deformities in Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia

Ernesto Ippolito MD, Pasquale Farsetti MD, Alison M. Boyce MD, Alessandro Corsi MD, Fernando Maio MD, Michael T. Collins MD

Fibrous dysplasia of bone is a skeletal dysplasia with a propensity to affect the femur in its polyostotic form, leading to deformity, fracture, and pain. The proximal femur is most commonly involved with a tendency to distal progression, thereby producing the typical shepherd’s crook deformity. However, there are few data on the spectrum and progression of femoral deformities in polyostotic fibrous dysplasia.