Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Shoulder 153 articles

Articles

The Open Latarjet Procedure Is More Reliable in Terms of Shoulder Stability Than Arthroscopic Bankart Repair

Charles Bessière MD, Christophe Trojani MD, PhD, Michel Carles MD, PhD, Saurabh S. Mehta MS, FRCS (Ed) (Tr & Orth), Pascal Boileau MD

Arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Latarjet bone block procedure are widely considered mainstays for surgical treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The choice between these procedures depends mainly on surgeon preference or training rather than published evidence.

Optimization of the Racking Hitch Knot: How Many Half Hitches and Which Suture Material Provide the Greatest Security?

James D. Kelly MD, Suketu Vaishnav MD, Bradley M. Saunders MD, Mark A. Schrumpf MD

Reliable methods of fixation of soft tissue and bone are of utmost importance in reconstructive shoulder surgery and in many orthopaedic applications. Current methods of securing lesser tuberosity osteotomies performed during shoulder arthroplasty and tuberosity fixation performed during repair of proximal humeral fractures often rely on alternating half hitches or surgeon’s knots regardless of the suture configuration used passing through the tissue (eg, Mason-Allen, Krackow). The racking hitch knot in contrast to half hitches allows sequential tightening, even under tension, with minimal risk of knot slippage or premature locking. These knot characteristics allow the surgeon to stepwise improve their reduction before committing and locking a construct, preventing hanging knots or under-tensioned repairs. However, little data exist to support the use the racking hitch knot to guide decision making regarding how to back up the knot or to explain the effect of suture material on security and strength.

Outcome After Reconstruction of the Proximal Humerus for Tumor Resection: A Systematic Review

Teun Teunis MD, Sjoerd P. F. T. Nota MD, Francis J. Hornicek MD, PhD, Joseph H. Schwab MD, MS, Santiago A. Lozano-Calderón MD, PhD

Tumors of the appendicular skeleton commonly affect the proximal humerus, but there is no consensus regarding the best reconstructive technique after proximal humerus resection for tumors of the shoulder.

Relative Fixation Strength of Rabbit Subscapularis Repair Is Comparable to Human Supraspinatus Repair at Time 0

Karimdad Otarodifard MD, Jeffrey Wong MD, Charles F. Preston MD, James E. Tibone MD, Thay Q. Lee PhD

Recent evidence suggests that the rabbit subscapularis tendon may be anatomically, biomechanically, and histologically suitable to study rotator cuff pathology and repair. However, biomechanical comparisons of rotator cuff repairs in this model have not been evaluated and compared to those in human cadaveric specimens.

Remplissage Versus Latarjet for Engaging Hill-Sachs Defects Without Substantial Glenoid Bone Loss: A Biomechanical Comparison

Ryan M. Degen MD, Joshua W. Giles BESc, James A. Johnson PhD, George S. Athwal MD, FRCSC

Recurrent shoulder instability is commonly associated with Hill-Sachs defects. These defects may engage the glenoid rim, contributing to glenohumeral dislocation. Two treatment options to manage engaging Hill-Sachs defects are the remplissage procedure, which fills the defect with soft tissue, and the Latarjet procedure, which increases glenoid arc length. Little evidence exists to support one over the other.

External Rotation Immobilization for Primary Shoulder Dislocation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Daniel B. Whelan MD, MSc, Robert Litchfield MD, Elizabeth Wambolt BSc(HK), CCRP, Katie N. Dainty PhD

The traditional treatment for primary anterior shoulder dislocations has been immobilization in a sling with the arm in a position of adduction and internal rotation. However, recent basic science and clinical data have suggested recurrent instability may be reduced with immobilization in external rotation after primary shoulder dislocation.

Biceps Detachment Decreases Joint Damage in a Rotator Cuff Tear Rat Model

Stephen J. Thomas PhD, ATC, Katherine E. Reuther BS, Jennica J. Tucker BS, Joseph J. Sarver PhD, Sarah M. Yannascoli MD, Adam C. Caro DVM, Pramod B. Voleti MD, Sarah I. Rooney MSE, David L. Glaser MD, Louis J. Soslowsky PhD

Pathology in the long head of the biceps tendon often occurs in patients with rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopic tenotomy is the most common treatment. However, the role of the long head of the biceps at the shoulder and the consequences of surgical detachment on the remaining shoulder structures remain unknown.

Effects of External Rotation on Anteroposterior Translations in the Shoulder: A Pilot Study

Andrew J. Brown BS, Richard E. Debski PhD, Carrie A. Voycheck PhD, Patrick J. McMahon MD

Using physical examination to make the diagnosis of shoulder instability can be difficult, because typical examination maneuvers are qualitative, difficult to standardize, and not reproducible. Measuring shoulder translation is especially difficult, which is a particular problem, because measuring it inaccurately may result in improper treatment of instability.

Deltoid-split or Deltopectoral Approaches for the Treatment of Displaced Proximal Humeral Fractures?

Benjamin Buecking MD, Juliane Mohr MD, Benjamin Bockmann, Ralph Zettl MD, Steffen Ruchholtz MD

Proximal humeral fractures are mainly associated with osteoporosis and are becoming more common with the aging of our society. The best surgical approach for internal fixation of displaced proximal humeral fractures is still being debated.