Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Shoulder 160 articles

Articles

Version Correction via Eccentric Reaming Compromises Remaining Bone Quality in B2 Glenoids: A Computational Study

Xiang Chen MS, Akhil S. Reddy BS, Andreas Kontaxis PhD, Daniel S. Choi MEng, Timothy Wright PhD, David M. Dines MD, Russell F. Warren MD, Julien Berhouet MD, Lawrence V. Gulotta MD

Version correction via eccentric reaming reduces clinically important retroversion in Walch type B2 glenoids (those with substantial glenoid retroversion and a second, sclerotic neoglenoid cavity) before total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). Clinically, an increased risk of glenoid component loosening in B2 glenoids was hypothesized to be the result of compromised glenoid bone quality attributable to eccentric reaming. However, no established guidelines exist regarding how much version correction can be applied without compromising the quality of glenoid bone.

Does Postoperative Glenoid Retroversion Affect the 2-Year Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes for Total Shoulder Arthroplasty?

Benjamin C. Service MD, Jason E. Hsu MD, Jeremy S. Somerson MD, Stacy M. Russ BA, Frederick A. Matsen MD

While glenoid retroversion and posterior humeral head decentering are common preoperative features of severely arthritic glenohumeral joints, the relationship of postoperative glenoid component retroversion to the clinical results of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) is unclear. Studies have indicated concern for inferior outcomes when glenoid components are inserted in 15° or more retroversion.

Revision to Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Restores Stability for Patients With Unstable Shoulder Prostheses

Nicholas M. Hernandez MD, Brian P. Chalmers MD, Eric R. Wagner MD, John W. Sperling MD, Robert H. Cofield MD, Joaquin Sanchez-Sotelo MD, PhD

Instability after shoulder arthroplasty remains a complication with limited salvage options. Reoperation for instability with anatomic designs has led to high rates of persistent instability, therefore we aimed to evaluate the use of RSA for treatment of prosthetic instability.

Does Humeral Component Lateralization in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Affect Rotator Cuff Torque? Evaluation in a Cadaver Model

Kevin Chan MD, MSc, FRCSC, G. Daniel G. Langohr PhD, Matthew Mahaffy BESc, James A. Johnson PhD, George S. Athwal MD, FRCSC

Humeral component lateralization in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) may improve the biomechanical advantage of the rotator cuff, which could improve the torque generated by the rotator cuff and increase internal and external rotation of the shoulder.

What Are the Complications, Survival, and Outcomes After Revision to Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty in Patients Older Than 80 Years?

Eduard Alentorn-Geli MD, Nicholas J. Clark MD, Andrew T. Assenmacher MD, Brian T. Samuelsen MD, Joaquín Sánchez-Sotelo MD, Robert H. Cofield MD, John W. Sperling MD

By the time patients with a failed shoulder arthroplasty require revision surgery, a substantial number are older than 80 years. The risk of complications of revision arthroplasty in this elderly population is largely unknown and needs to be considered when contemplating whether these patients are too frail for revision surgery.

Patients Older Than 40 Years With Unilateral Occupational Claims for New Shoulder and Knee Symptoms Have Bilateral MRI Changes

Tiffany C. Liu BA, Nina Leung PhD, Leonard Edwards BS, David Ring MD, PhD, Edward Bernacki MD, MPH, Melissa D. Tonn MD, MBA, MPH

Minor events that occur in the workplace sometimes are evaluated with MRI, which may reveal age-related changes in the symptomatic body part. These age-related changes are often ascribed to the event. However, evidence of similar or worse pathophysiology in the contralateral joint would suggest that the symptoms might be new, but the pathophysiology is not.

Matrix Metalloproteases 1 and 3 Promoter Gene Polymorphism Is Associated With Rotator Cuff Tear

Jorge H. Assunção MD, Alexandre L. Godoy-Santos PhD, Maria Cristina L. G. Santos PhD, Eduardo A. Malavolta PhD, Mauro E. C. Gracitelli PhD, Arnaldo A. Ferreira Neto PhD

Studies suggest that the collagen degeneration and disordered arrangement of collagen fibers in rotator cuff tears are associated with an increase in activity of matrix metalloproteases 1 and 3 (MMP-1 and MMP-3), and that MMP activity may be in part genetically mediated. The degree to which this might be clinically relevant in patients with rotator cuff tears has not been well characterized.

What Influence Does Progression of a Nonhealing Rotator Cuff Tear Have on Shoulder Pain and Function?

Yoon Sang Jeon MD, Rag Gyu Kim MD, Sang-Jin Shin MD

There have been numerous reports of clinical outcomes associated with tendon healing after repair that suggest a nonhealed tendon has a negative effect on postoperative clinical outcomes. However, to our knowledge, there has been no report on the relationship between tear size progression of nonhealed tendons and clinical outcomes.

Does the Critical Shoulder Angle Correlate With Rotator Cuff Tear Progression?

Peter N. Chalmers MD, Dane Salazar MD, Karen Steger-May MA, Aaron M. Chamberlain MD, Ken Yamaguchi MD, MBA, Jay D. Keener MD

The critical shoulder angle (CSA) has been reported to be associated with rotator cuff disease and has been suggested as an etiology for cuff tears. However, it is unclear whether acromial morphologic characteristics such as CSA are a cause or effect because all studies to date have been retrospective.