Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Knee 448 articles

Articles

What Are the Frequency, Associated Factors, and Mortality of Amputation and Arthrodesis After a Failed Infected TKA?

Min-Sun Son PhD, Edmund Lau MS, Javad Parvizi MD, Michael A. Mont MD, Kevin J. Bozic MD, MBA, Steven Kurtz PhD

For patients with failed surgical treatment of an infected TKA, salvage operations such as arthrodesis or above-knee amputation (AKA) may be considered. Clinical and institutional factors associated with AKA and arthrodesis after a failed TKA have not been investigated in a large-scale population, and the utilization rate and trend of these measures are not well known.

Report of the Primary Outcomes for Gait Mechanics in Men of the ACL-SPORTS Trial: Secondary Prevention With and Without Perturbation Training Does Not Restore Gait Symmetry in Men 1 or 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction

Jacob John Capin PT, DPT, MS, Ryan Zarzycki PT, DPT, Amelia Arundale PT, DPT, SCS, Kathleen Cummer PT, PhD, DPT, Lynn Snyder-Mackler PT, ScD, FAPTA

Movement asymmetries during walking are common after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction and may influence the early development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. Preoperative neuromuscular training (like perturbation training, which is neuromuscular training requiring selective muscle activation in response to surface perturbations) improves gait asymmetries and functional outcomes among people who are ACL-deficient, but the effect of postoperative perturbation training on gait mechanics after ACL reconstruction is unknown.

Hamstring Autograft versus Patellar Tendon Autograft for ACL Reconstruction: Is There a Difference in Graft Failure Rate? A Meta-analysis of 47,613 Patients

Brian T. Samuelsen MD, MBA, Kate E. Webster PhD, Nick R. Johnson BS, Timothy E. Hewett PhD, Aaron J. Krych MD

Bone-patellar tendon-bone (bone-tendon-bone) and four-strand hamstring tendon grafts (hamstring) are the most commonly utilized autografts for primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Existing clinical trials, registry studies, and meta-analyses offer conflicting opinions regarding the most favorable graft choice.

Can Spatiotemporal Fluoride (18 F− ) Uptake be Used to Assess Bone Formation in the Tibia? A Longitudinal Study Using PET/CT

Henrik Lundblad MD, PhD, Charlotte Karlsson-Thur MD, PhD, Gerald Q. Maguire PhD, Cathrine Jonsson PhD, Marilyn E. Noz PhD, Michael P. Zeleznik PhD, Lars Weidenhielm MD, PhD

When a bone is broken for any reason, it is important for the orthopaedic surgeon to know how bone healing is progressing. There has been resurgence in the use of the fluoride (F) ion to evaluate various bone conditions. This has been made possible by availability of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT hybrid scanners together with cyclotrons. Absorbed on the bone surface from blood flow,Fattaches to the osteoblasts in cancellous bone and acts as a pharmacokinetic agent, which reflects the local physiologic activity of bone. This is important because it shows bone formation indicating that the bone is healing or no bone formation indicating no healing. AsFis extracted from blood in proportion to blood flow and bone formation, it thus enables determination of bone healing progress.

Increased Risk of Revision, Reoperation, and Implant Constraint in TKA After Multiligament Knee Surgery

Steven I. Pancio MD, Paul L. Sousa MD, Aaron J. Krych MD, Matthew P. Abdel MD, Bruce A. Levy MD, Diane L. Dahm MD, Michael J. Stuart MD

The risk of major complications and revision arthroplasty after TKA in patients who previously underwent multiligament knee surgery have been poorly characterized.

What is the Accuracy of Nuclear Imaging in the Assessment of Periprosthetic Knee Infection? A Meta-analysis

Steven J. Verberne MD, Remko J. A. Sonnega MD, Olivier P. P. Temmerman MD, PhD, Pieter G. Raijmakers MD, PhD

In the assessment of possible periprosthetic knee infection, various imaging modalities are used without consensus regarding the most accurate technique.

No Clinically Important Difference in Knee Scores or Instability Between Transtibial and Inlay Techniques for PCL Reconstruction: A Systematic Review

Young-Soo Shin MD, Hyun-Jung Kim MPH, PhD, Dae-Hee Lee MD, PhD

It is unclear whether the biomechanical superiority of the inlay technique over the transtibial technique, arising from avoidance of the killer turn at the graft-tunnel margin of the proximal tibia during posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, leads to better knee scores or greater knee stability.

Lateral-compartment Osteophytes are not Associated With Lateral-compartment Cartilage Degeneration in Arthritic Varus Knees

Wenzel Waldstein MD, Maximilian F. Kasparek MD, Martin Faschingbauer MD, Reinhard Windhager MD, PhD, Friedrich Boettner MD

Progression of arthritis in the lateral compartment is one of the main failure modes of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). The decision regarding whether to perform a medial UKA sometimes is made based on whether lateral-compartment osteophytes are visible on plain radiographs obtained before surgery, but it is not clear whether the presence of lateral-compartment osteophytes signifies that the cartilage in the lateral compartment is arthritic.

No Decrease in Knee Survivorship or Outcomes Scores for Patients With HIV Infection Who Undergo TKA

Kimona Issa MD, Todd P. Pierce MD, Steven F. Harwin MD, Anthony J. Scillia MD, Anthony Festa MD, Michael A. Mont MD

HIV is prevalent worldwide and numerous patients with this diagnosis ultimately may become candidates for TKA. Although some studies have suggested that complications are more common in patients with HIV who undergo TKA, these studies largely were done before the contemporary era of HIV management; moreover, it is unclear whether patients with HIV achieve lower patient-reported outcome scores or inferior implant survivorship.

What Differences in Morphologic Features of the Knee Exist Among Patients of Various Races? A Systematic Review

T. K. Kim MD, PhD, Mark Phillips BSc, Mohit Bhandari MD, PhD, John Watson, Rajesh Malhotra MS, FRCS

Most TKA prostheses are designed based on the anatomy of white patients. Individual studies have identified key anthropometric differences between the knees of the white population and other major ethnic groups, yet there is limited understanding of what these findings may indicate if analyzed collectively.