Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Knee 450 articles

Articles

What Is the Mid-term Failure Rate of Revision ACL Reconstruction? A Systematic Review

Alberto Grassi MD, Christopher Kim MD, Giulio Maria Marcheggiani Muccioli MD, Stefano Zaffagnini MD, Annunziato Amendola MD

When anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction fails, a revision procedure may be performed to improve knee function, correct instability, and allow return to activities. The results of revision ACL reconstruction have been reported to produce good but inferior patient-reported and objective outcomes compared with primary ACL reconstruction, but the degree to which this is the case varies widely among published studies and may be influenced by heterogeneity of patients, techniques, and endpoints assessed. For those reasons, a systematic review may provide important insights.

High Interspecimen Variability in Engagement of the Anterolateral Ligament: An In Vitro Cadaveric Study

Robert N. Kent BSE, James F. Boorman-Padgett BS, Ran Thein MD, Jelle P. List MD, Danyal H. Nawabi MD, Thomas L. Wickiewicz MD, Carl W. Imhauser PhD, Andrew D. Pearle MD

Anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction as an adjunct to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains a subject of clinical debate. This uncertainty may be driven in part by a lack of knowledge regarding where, within the range of knee motion, the ALL begins to carry force (engages).

Variations in Knee Kinematics After ACL Injury and After Reconstruction Are Correlated With Bone Shape Differences

Drew A. Lansdown MD, Valentina Pedoia PhD, Musa Zaid MD, Keiko Amano MD, Richard B. Souza PT, PhD, Xiaojuan Li PhD, C. Benjamin Ma MD

The factors that contribute to the abnormal knee kinematics after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and ACL reconstruction remain unclear. Bone shape has been implicated in the development of hip and knee osteoarthritis, although there is little knowledge about the effects of bone shape on knee kinematics after ACL injury and after ACL reconstruction.

Knee Abduction Affects Greater Magnitude of Change in ACL and MCL Strains Than Matched Internal Tibial Rotation In Vitro

Nathaniel A. Bates PhD, Rebecca J. Nesbitt PhD, Jason T. Shearn PhD, Gregory D. Myer PhD, Timothy E. Hewett PhD

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injures incur over USD 2 billion in annual medical costs and prevention has become a topic of interest in biomechanics. However, literature conflicts persist over how knee rotations contribute to ACL strain and ligament injury. To maximize the efficacy of ACL injury prevention, the effects of underlying mechanics need to be better understood.

Rotational Laxity Control by the Anterolateral Ligament and the Lateral Meniscus Is Dependent on Knee Flexion Angle: A Cadaveric Biomechanical Study

Timothy Lording FRACS, Gillian Corbo BSc, Dianne Bryant PhD, Timothy A. Burkhart PhD, Alan Getgood MD

Injury to the anterolateral ligament (ALL) has been reported to contribute to high-grade anterolateral laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Failure to address ALL injury has been suggested as a cause of persistent rotational laxity after ACL reconstruction. Lateral meniscus posterior root (LMPR) tears have also been shown to cause increased internal rotation of the knee.

Does the FIFA 11+ Injury Prevention Program Reduce the Incidence of ACL Injury in Male Soccer Players?

Holly J. Silvers-Granelli MPT, Mario Bizzini PhD, MSC, PT, Amelia Arundale DPT, Bert R. Mandelbaum MD, Lynn Snyder-Mackler PT, ScD

The FIFA 11+ injury prevention program has been shown to decrease the risk of soccer injuries in men and women. The program has also been shown to decrease time loss resulting from injury. However, previous studies have not specifically investigated how the program might impact the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in male soccer players.

What is the Responsiveness and Respondent Burden of the New Knee Society Score?

Rajesh N. Maniar MS Orth, MCh Orth, Parul R. Maniar MS, FRCO, Debashish Chanda MS, Ortho, Dnyaneshwar Gajbhare MBBS, MD, Toral Chouhan MBA

Although the new Knee Society score (NKSS) has been validated by a task force, a longitudinal study of the same cohort of patients to evaluate the score’s responsiveness and respondent burden has not been reported, to our knowledge.

What Factors Influence the Biomechanical Properties of Allograft Tissue for ACL Reconstruction? A Systematic Review

Drew A. Lansdown MD, Andrew J. Riff MD, Molly Meadows MD, Adam B. Yanke MD, Bernard R. Bach MD

Allograft tissue is used in 22% to 42% of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. Clinical outcomes have been inconsistent with allograft tissue, with some series reporting no differences in outcomes and others reporting increased risk of failure. There are numerous variations in processing and preparation that may influence the eventual performance of allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction. We sought to perform a systematic review to summarize the factors that affect the biomechanical properties of allograft tissue for use in ACL reconstruction. Many factors might impact the biomechanical properties of allograft tissue, and these should be understood when considering using allograft tissue or when reporting outcomes from allograft reconstruction.

What Factors Are Associated With Femoral Component Internal Rotation in TKA Using the Gap Balancing Technique?

Seung-Yup Lee MD, MSc, Hong-Chul Lim MD, PhD, Ki-Mo Jang MD, PhD, Ji-Hoon Bae MD, PhD

When using the gap-balancing technique for TKA, excessive medial release and varus proximal tibial resection can be associated with internal rotation of the femoral component. Previous studies have evaluated the causes of femoral component rotational alignment with a separate factor analysis using unadjusted statistical methods, which might result in treatment effects being attributed to confounding variables.

Have the Causes of Revision for Total and Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasties Changed During the Past Two Decades?

Gro S. Dyrhovden MD, Stein Håkon L. Lygre PhD, Mona Badawy MD, PhD, Øystein Gøthesen MD, PhD, Ove Furnes MD, PhD

Revisions after knee arthroplasty are expected to increase, and the epidemiology of failure mechanisms is changing as new implants, technology, and surgical techniques evolve.