Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Knee 435 articles

Articles

Does the FIFA 11+ Injury Prevention Program Reduce the Incidence of ACL Injury in Male Soccer Players?

Holly J. Silvers-Granelli MPT, Mario Bizzini PhD, MSC, PT, Amelia Arundale DPT, Bert R. Mandelbaum MD, Lynn Snyder-Mackler PT, ScD

The FIFA 11+ injury prevention program has been shown to decrease the risk of soccer injuries in men and women. The program has also been shown to decrease time loss resulting from injury. However, previous studies have not specifically investigated how the program might impact the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in male soccer players.

What is the Responsiveness and Respondent Burden of the New Knee Society Score?

Rajesh N. Maniar MS Orth, MCh Orth, Parul R. Maniar MS, FRCO, Debashish Chanda MS, Ortho, Dnyaneshwar Gajbhare MBBS, MD, Toral Chouhan MBA

Although the new Knee Society score (NKSS) has been validated by a task force, a longitudinal study of the same cohort of patients to evaluate the score’s responsiveness and respondent burden has not been reported, to our knowledge.

What Factors Influence the Biomechanical Properties of Allograft Tissue for ACL Reconstruction? A Systematic Review

Drew A. Lansdown MD, Andrew J. Riff MD, Molly Meadows MD, Adam B. Yanke MD, Bernard R. Bach MD

Allograft tissue is used in 22% to 42% of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. Clinical outcomes have been inconsistent with allograft tissue, with some series reporting no differences in outcomes and others reporting increased risk of failure. There are numerous variations in processing and preparation that may influence the eventual performance of allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction. We sought to perform a systematic review to summarize the factors that affect the biomechanical properties of allograft tissue for use in ACL reconstruction. Many factors might impact the biomechanical properties of allograft tissue, and these should be understood when considering using allograft tissue or when reporting outcomes from allograft reconstruction.

What Factors Are Associated With Femoral Component Internal Rotation in TKA Using the Gap Balancing Technique?

Seung-Yup Lee MD, MSc, Hong-Chul Lim MD, PhD, Ki-Mo Jang MD, PhD, Ji-Hoon Bae MD, PhD

When using the gap-balancing technique for TKA, excessive medial release and varus proximal tibial resection can be associated with internal rotation of the femoral component. Previous studies have evaluated the causes of femoral component rotational alignment with a separate factor analysis using unadjusted statistical methods, which might result in treatment effects being attributed to confounding variables.

Have the Causes of Revision for Total and Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasties Changed During the Past Two Decades?

Gro S. Dyrhovden MD, Stein Håkon L. Lygre PhD, Mona Badawy MD, PhD, Øystein Gøthesen MD, PhD, Ove Furnes MD, PhD

Revisions after knee arthroplasty are expected to increase, and the epidemiology of failure mechanisms is changing as new implants, technology, and surgical techniques evolve.

What is the Ideal Route of Administration of Tranexamic Acid in TKA? A Randomized Controlled Trial

Sung Yup Lee MD, Suri Chong MD, Dhanasekaraprabu Balasubramanian MS (Orth), Young Gon Na MD, Tae Kyun Kim MD, PhD

TKA commonly involves substantial blood loss and tranexamic acid has been used to reduce blood loss after TKA. Numerous clinical trials have documented the efficacy and safety of intravenous (IV) or intraarticular (IA) use of tranexamic acid. Combined administration of tranexamic acid also has been suggested; however, there is no consensus regarding the ideal route of tranexamic acid administration.

Crosscultural Adaptation and Validation of the Korean Version of the New Knee Society Knee Scoring System

Seok Jin Kim MD, Mohnish Singh Basur DNB (ortho), Chang Kyu Park MD, Suri Chong MD, Yeon Gwi Kang MS, Moon Ju Kim MS, Jeong Seong Jeong MS, Tae Kyun Kim MD, PhD

The 2011 Knee Society Score(2011 KS Score) is used to characterize the expectations, symptoms, physical activity, and satisfaction of patients who undergo TKA and is widely used to assess the outcome of TKA. However, it has not been adapted or validated for use in Korea.

What Are the Frequency, Associated Factors, and Mortality of Amputation and Arthrodesis After a Failed Infected TKA?

Min-Sun Son PhD, Edmund Lau MS, Javad Parvizi MD, Michael A. Mont MD, Kevin J. Bozic MD, MBA, Steven Kurtz PhD

For patients with failed surgical treatment of an infected TKA, salvage operations such as arthrodesis or above-knee amputation (AKA) may be considered. Clinical and institutional factors associated with AKA and arthrodesis after a failed TKA have not been investigated in a large-scale population, and the utilization rate and trend of these measures are not well known.

Report of the Primary Outcomes for Gait Mechanics in Men of the ACL-SPORTS Trial: Secondary Prevention With and Without Perturbation Training Does Not Restore Gait Symmetry in Men 1 or 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction

Jacob John Capin PT, DPT, MS, Ryan Zarzycki PT, DPT, Amelia Arundale PT, DPT, SCS, Kathleen Cummer PT, PhD, DPT, Lynn Snyder-Mackler PT, ScD, FAPTA

Movement asymmetries during walking are common after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction and may influence the early development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. Preoperative neuromuscular training (like perturbation training, which is neuromuscular training requiring selective muscle activation in response to surface perturbations) improves gait asymmetries and functional outcomes among people who are ACL-deficient, but the effect of postoperative perturbation training on gait mechanics after ACL reconstruction is unknown.

Hamstring Autograft versus Patellar Tendon Autograft for ACL Reconstruction: Is There a Difference in Graft Failure Rate? A Meta-analysis of 47,613 Patients

Brian T. Samuelsen MD, MBA, Kate E. Webster PhD, Nick R. Johnson BS, Timothy E. Hewett PhD, Aaron J. Krych MD

Bone-patellar tendon-bone (bone-tendon-bone) and four-strand hamstring tendon grafts (hamstring) are the most commonly utilized autografts for primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Existing clinical trials, registry studies, and meta-analyses offer conflicting opinions regarding the most favorable graft choice.