Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Knee 426 articles

Articles

Hamstring Autograft versus Patellar Tendon Autograft for ACL Reconstruction: Is There a Difference in Graft Failure Rate? A Meta-analysis of 47,613 Patients

Brian T. Samuelsen MD, MBA, Kate E. Webster PhD, Nick R. Johnson BS, Timothy E. Hewett PhD, Aaron J. Krych MD

Bone-patellar tendon-bone (bone-tendon-bone) and four-strand hamstring tendon grafts (hamstring) are the most commonly utilized autografts for primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Existing clinical trials, registry studies, and meta-analyses offer conflicting opinions regarding the most favorable graft choice.

Can Spatiotemporal Fluoride (18 F− ) Uptake be Used to Assess Bone Formation in the Tibia? A Longitudinal Study Using PET/CT

Henrik Lundblad MD, PhD, Charlotte Karlsson-Thur MD, PhD, Gerald Q. Maguire PhD, Cathrine Jonsson PhD, Marilyn E. Noz PhD, Michael P. Zeleznik PhD, Lars Weidenhielm MD, PhD

When a bone is broken for any reason, it is important for the orthopaedic surgeon to know how bone healing is progressing. There has been resurgence in the use of the fluoride (F) ion to evaluate various bone conditions. This has been made possible by availability of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT hybrid scanners together with cyclotrons. Absorbed on the bone surface from blood flow,Fattaches to the osteoblasts in cancellous bone and acts as a pharmacokinetic agent, which reflects the local physiologic activity of bone. This is important because it shows bone formation indicating that the bone is healing or no bone formation indicating no healing. AsFis extracted from blood in proportion to blood flow and bone formation, it thus enables determination of bone healing progress.

Increased Risk of Revision, Reoperation, and Implant Constraint in TKA After Multiligament Knee Surgery

Steven I. Pancio MD, Paul L. Sousa MD, Aaron J. Krych MD, Matthew P. Abdel MD, Bruce A. Levy MD, Diane L. Dahm MD, Michael J. Stuart MD

The risk of major complications and revision arthroplasty after TKA in patients who previously underwent multiligament knee surgery have been poorly characterized.

What is the Accuracy of Nuclear Imaging in the Assessment of Periprosthetic Knee Infection? A Meta-analysis

Steven J. Verberne MD, Remko J. A. Sonnega MD, Olivier P. P. Temmerman MD, PhD, Pieter G. Raijmakers MD, PhD

In the assessment of possible periprosthetic knee infection, various imaging modalities are used without consensus regarding the most accurate technique.

No Clinically Important Difference in Knee Scores or Instability Between Transtibial and Inlay Techniques for PCL Reconstruction: A Systematic Review

Young-Soo Shin MD, Hyun-Jung Kim MPH, PhD, Dae-Hee Lee MD, PhD

It is unclear whether the biomechanical superiority of the inlay technique over the transtibial technique, arising from avoidance of the killer turn at the graft-tunnel margin of the proximal tibia during posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, leads to better knee scores or greater knee stability.

Lateral-compartment Osteophytes are not Associated With Lateral-compartment Cartilage Degeneration in Arthritic Varus Knees

Wenzel Waldstein MD, Maximilian F. Kasparek MD, Martin Faschingbauer MD, Reinhard Windhager MD, PhD, Friedrich Boettner MD

Progression of arthritis in the lateral compartment is one of the main failure modes of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). The decision regarding whether to perform a medial UKA sometimes is made based on whether lateral-compartment osteophytes are visible on plain radiographs obtained before surgery, but it is not clear whether the presence of lateral-compartment osteophytes signifies that the cartilage in the lateral compartment is arthritic.

No Decrease in Knee Survivorship or Outcomes Scores for Patients With HIV Infection Who Undergo TKA

Kimona Issa MD, Todd P. Pierce MD, Steven F. Harwin MD, Anthony J. Scillia MD, Anthony Festa MD, Michael A. Mont MD

HIV is prevalent worldwide and numerous patients with this diagnosis ultimately may become candidates for TKA. Although some studies have suggested that complications are more common in patients with HIV who undergo TKA, these studies largely were done before the contemporary era of HIV management; moreover, it is unclear whether patients with HIV achieve lower patient-reported outcome scores or inferior implant survivorship.

What Differences in Morphologic Features of the Knee Exist Among Patients of Various Races? A Systematic Review

T. K. Kim MD, PhD, Mark Phillips BSc, Mohit Bhandari MD, PhD, John Watson, Rajesh Malhotra MS, FRCS

Most TKA prostheses are designed based on the anatomy of white patients. Individual studies have identified key anthropometric differences between the knees of the white population and other major ethnic groups, yet there is limited understanding of what these findings may indicate if analyzed collectively.

Does the Utilization of Allograft Tissue in Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Restore Patellar Stability?

Eric Hohn MD, Nirav K. Pandya MD

Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is one of several surgical procedures used to treat patellofemoral instability. Use of allograft tissue can preserve autogenous tissue and may be preferable in patients with connective tissue disorders or ligamentous laxity. Although there are successful reports in adults, it is unclear if the use of allograft tissue in MPFL reconstruction can restore patellofemoral stability in children and adolescents.

Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions in Family Members: Does a Positive Family History Impact Phenotypic Potency?

Alex L. Gornitzky MD, R. Justin Mistovich MD, Brittany Atuahuene BA, Eileen P. Storey BA, Theodore J. Ganley MD

Although repetitive microtrauma and athletic overuse patterns are most commonly associated with osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), recent studies have identified a potential genetic predisposition for OCD. Several case series have documented family pedigrees that support autosomal-dominant inheritance, but the families in these studies were all selected as a result of unique histories that may not accurately represent OCD inheritance patterns at large. Because there has been little investigation beyond these case reports, we aimed to describe a broader, more representative pattern of OCD inheritance applicable to all affected patients.