Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Hip 725 articles

Articles

Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty With Metasul Bearings Provides Good Results in Active Young Patients: A Concise Followup

Christian P. Delaunay MD, Sophie Putman MD, Benjamin Puliéro MD, Matthieu Bégin MD, Henri Migaud MD, François Bonnomet MD

A primary concern of younger, more active patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the longevity of the implant. Cementless fixation and hard-on-hard bearings are recognized as options to enhance THA durability. Earlier, we published a series of 83 cementless primary THAs using 28-mm metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings in patients aged 50 years or younger; here we provide concise followup on that same group after an additional 8-year survey period.

Do the Reasons for Ceramic-on-ceramic Revisions Differ From Other Bearings in Total Hip Arthroplasty?

Henri Migaud MD, Sophie Putman MD, Grégory Kern MD, Ronald Isida MD, Julien Girard MD, PhD, Nassima Ramdane PhD, Christian P. Delaunay MD, Moussa Hamadouche MD, PhD

Despite widespread use of ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) during the past 10 years, little is known about why revisions are performed in hips with this bearing or the time elapsed before revision.

Periprosthetic Joint Infection in Hip Arthroplasty: Is There an Association Between Infection and Bearing Surface Type?

Rocco P. Pitto MD, PhD, Laurent Sedel MD

Preliminary studies have raised the question of whether certain prosthetic biomaterials used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) bearings are associated with increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). For example, some observational data suggest the risk of PJI is higher with metal-on-metal bearings. However, it is not known whether other bearings—including ceramic bearings or metal-on-polyethylene bearings—may be associated with a higher or lower risk of PJI.

Otto Aufranc Award: A Multicenter, Randomized Study of Outpatient versus Inpatient Total Hip Arthroplasty

Nitin Goyal MD, Antonia F. Chen MD, MBA, Sarah E. Padgett PA-C, Timothy L. Tan MD, Michael M. Kheir MD, Robert H. Hopper PhD, William G. Hamilton MD, William J. Hozack MD

Length of stay after total hip arthroplasty (THA) has decreased over the last two decades. However, published studies that have examined same-day and early discharge protocols after THA have been done in highly selected patient groups operated on by senior surgeons in a nonrandomized fashion without control subjects.

How Reliable Is the Alpha-defensin Immunoassay Test for Diagnosing Periprosthetic Joint Infection? A Prospective Study

Tommaso Bonanzinga MD, Akos Zahar MD, Michael Dütsch MSc, Christian Lausmann MD, Daniel Kendoff MD, PhD, Thorsten Gehrke MD

A key issue in the treatment of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the correct diagnosis. The main problem is lack of diagnostic tools able to diagnose a PJI with high accuracy. Alpha-defensin has been proposed as a possible solution, but in the current literature, there is a lack of independent validation.

No Correlation Between Serum Markers and Early Functional Outcome After Contemporary THA

Kirsten L. Poehling-Monaghan MD, Michael J. Taunton MD, Atul F. Kamath MD, Robert T. Trousdale MD, Rafael J. Sierra MD, Mark W. Pagnano MD

Serum markers of inflammation and muscle damage have shown clinical utility in some areas of medicine, but their value in determining the invasiveness or in predicting the early functional outcomes after total hip arthroplasty (THA) has not been demonstrated.

Ultrashort versus Conventional Anatomic Cementless Femoral Stems in the Same Patients Younger Than 55 Years

Young-Hoo Kim, Jang-Won Park, Jun-Shik Kim

Because the clinical and radiographic performance of an ultrashort anatomic cementless stem has been investigated in only two randomized controlled studies, well-designed trials should aim for a thorough comparison of the outcomes of ultrashort anatomic cementless and conventional anatomic cementless stems.

The Natural History of Osteoarthritis: What Happens to the Other Hip?

Harlan C. Amstutz MD, Michel J. Le Duff MA

Idiopathic osteoarthritis (OA) is a common diagnosis leading to hip arthroplasty. Patients undergoing unilateral hip arthroplasty often wonder whether their other hip will follow the same path as the one that was operated on, and if so, when? There also are limited data available to predict from AP radiographs which contralateral hips will have OA develop and which will not.

Survivorship of the Bernese Periacetabular Osteotomy: What Factors are Associated with Long-term Failure?

Joel Wells MD, MPH, Michael Millis MD, Young-Jo Kim MD, PhD, Evgeny Bulat MA, Patricia Miller MS, Travis Matheney MD

The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) continues to be a commonly performed nonarthroplasty option to treat symptomatic developmental hip dysplasia, but there are few long-term followup studies evaluating results after PAO.

Early Subsidence Predicts Failure of a Cemented Femoral Stem With Minor Design Changes

Per-Erik Johanson MD, Martin Antonsson MStat MScCSE, Bita Shareghi BSc, Johan Kärrholm MD, PhD

Radiostereometry (RSA) measurements of early micromotion can predict later failure in hip and knee prostheses. In hip implants, RSA has been particularly helpful in the evaluation of composite-beam stem designs. The Spectron EF Primary stem (Smith & Nephew, London, UK) has shown inferior performance compared with its predecessors in both clinical studies and registry reports. Early RSA studies have shown somewhat greater subsidence for the Spectron EF Primary stem compared with the earlier Spectron EF, but still within boundaries considered to be safe.