Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Hip 716 articles

Articles

T1ρ Hip Cartilage Mapping in Assessing Patients With Cam Morphology: How Can We Optimize the Regions of Interest?

Helen Anwander MD, Kawan S. Rakhra MD, Gerd Melkus PhD, Paul E. Beaulé MD

T1ρ MRI has been shown feasible to detect the biochemical status of hip cartilage, but various region-of-interest strategies have been used, compromising the reproducibility and comparability between different institutions and studies.

Does Surgeon Experience Impact the Risk of Complications After Bernese Periacetabular Osteotomy?

Eduardo N. Novais MD, Patrick M. Carry BA, Lauryn A. Kestel BS, Brian Ketterman BS, Christopher M. Brusalis BA, Wudbhav N. Sankar MD

Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a technically challenging procedure with potential risk for major complications and a previously reported steep learning curve. However, the impact of contemporary hip preservation fellowships on the learning curve of PAO has not been established.

Satisfying Results of Primary Hip Arthroplasty in Patients With Hip Dysplasia at a Mean Followup of 20 Years

Ena Colo MD, Wim H. C. Rijnen MD, PhD, Jean W. M. Gardeniers MD, PhD, Albert Kampen MD, PhD, B. Willem Schreurs MD, PhD

Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common cause of secondary osteoarthritis (OA) in younger patients, and when end-stage OA develops, a THA can provide a solution. Different options have been developed to reconstruct these defects, one of which is impaction bone grafting combined with a cemented cup. To determine the true value of a specific technique, it is important to evaluate patients at a long-term followup. As there are no long-term studies, to our knowledge, on THA in patients with DDH using impaction bone grafting with a cemented cup, we present the results of this technique at a mean of 15 years in patients with previous DDH.

What Is the Natural History of Asymptomatic Pseudotumors in Metal-on-metal THAs at Mid-term Followup?

Sujith Konan MBBS, MD (res), FRCS(Tr&Orth), Clive P. Duncan MD, MSc, FRCSC, Bassam S. Masri MD, FRCSC, Donald S. Garbuz MD, MSc, FRCSC

The risk of early revision because of pseudotumors in patients who have undergone large-head metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) is well documented. However, the natural history of asymptomatic pseudotumors or of MoM articulations without pseudotumors is less well understood. The aim of our study was to investigate the natural history of primary MoM THA at mid-term followup.

One-stage Revision With Catheter Infusion of Intraarticular Antibiotics Successfully Treats Infected THA

Leo A. Whiteside MD, M. E. Roy PhD

Two-stage revision surgery for infected total hip arthroplasty (THA) is commonly advocated, but substantial morbidity and expense are associated with this technique. In certain cases of infected THA, treatment with one-stage revision surgery and intraarticular infusion of antibiotics may offer a reasonable alternative with the distinct advantage of providing a means of delivering the drug in high concentrations.

Two- to 4-Year Followup of a Short Stem THA Construct: Excellent Fixation, Thigh Pain a Concern

Richard L. Amendola MS, Devon D. Goetz MD, Steve S. Liu MD, John J. Callaghan MD

Short stem cementless femoral components were developed to aid insertion through smaller incisions, preserve metaphyseal bone, and potentially decrease or limit the incidence of thigh pain. Despite some clinical success, the senior author (DDG) believed a higher percentage of his patients who had received a cementless short stem design were experiencing thigh pain, which, coupled with concerns about bone ingrowth fixation, motivated the review of this case series.

Is There a Difference in Revision Risk Between Metal and Ceramic Heads on Highly Crosslinked Polyethylene Liners?

Guy Cafri PhD, MStat, Elizabeth W. Paxton MA, Rebecca Love MPH, RN, Stefano A. Bini MD, Steven M. Kurtz PhD

The most common bearing surface used among primary THAs worldwide is a metal or ceramic femoral head that articulates against a highly crosslinked ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (HXLPE) acetabular liner. Despite their widespread use, relatively little is known about the comparative effectiveness of ceramic versus metal femoral heads with respect to risk of revision and dislocation as well as the role of head size in this relationship.

The Role of Highly Selective Implant Retention in the Infected Hip Arthroplasty

Moataz El-Husseiny MB BCh, MRCS, Dip Sport M, MD (Res), Fares S. Haddad BSc, MCh(Orth), FRCS(Orth), MD (Res), FFSEM

There is debate around how to treat patients with periprosthetic joint infection of the hip. When there is an ingrown component on one side of the arthroplasty and a loose component on the other, treatment is typically revision of the entire construct. There is an argument to retain an ingrown implant in instances in which removal would result in severe bone damage. However, little has been reported on the likelihood of success with this approach.

Does Surface Topography Play a Role in Taper Damage in Head-neck Modular Junctions?

Robin Pourzal PhD, Deborah J. Hall BS, Nguyen Q. Ha BA, Robert M. Urban, Brett R. Levine MD, Joshua J. Jacobs MD, Hannah J. Lundberg PhD

There are increasing reports of total hip arthroplasty failure subsequent to modular taper junction corrosion. The surfaces of tapers are machined to have circumferential machining marks, resulting in a surface topography of alternating peaks and valleys on the scale of micrometers. It is unclear if the geometry of this machined surface topography influences the degree of fretting and corrosion damage present on modular taper junctions or if there are differences between modular taper junction material couples.