Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Hip 719 articles

Articles

Fee-based Care is Important for Access to Prompt Treatment of Hip Fractures Among Veterans

Kelly K. Richardson PhD, Peter Cram MD, Mary Vaughan-Sarrazin PhD, Peter J. Kaboli MD, MS

Hip fracture is a medical emergency for which delayed treatment increases risk of disability and death. In emergencies, veterans without access to a Veterans Administration (VA) hospital may be admitted to non-VA hospitals under fee-based (NVA-FB) care paid by the VA. The affect of NVA-FB care for treatment and outcomes of hip fractures is unknown.

Vascularized Fibular Grafts for Avascular Necrosis After Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: Is Hip Preservation Possible?

Todd Bertrand MD, James R. Urbaniak MD, Robert K. Lark MD, MS

Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is a potential complication in patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), radiographically occurring in 3–60%. This may lead to early hip fusion or hip arthroplasty. Free vascularized fibular grafting (FVFG) may provide a reasonable means to preserve the femoral head.

Severe Metal-induced Osteolysis Many Years After Unipolar Hip Endoprosthesis

Matthew A. Mann MD, Dylan Tanzer DEC, Michael Tanzer MD

Modularity of the femoral head-neck junction provides increased intraoperative flexibility to the surgeon. Complications of this modularity include damage to the trunnion, with subsequent bone and/or soft tissue loss from adverse reactions to metal debris.

Joint Space Predicts THA After Hip Arthroscopy in Patients 50 Years and Older

Marc J. Philippon MD, Karen K. Briggs MPH, John C. Carlisle MD, Diana C. Patterson BA

All patients considering joint-preserving hip arthroscopy should be educated on the risk of THA after arthroscopy. The degree of radiographic osteoarthritis predicts subsequent THA. To provide patients with the best information, the best radiographic measure that predicts THA after hip arthroscopy should be identified.

Case Report: Osteoid Osteoma of the Acetabulum Treated With Arthroscopy-assisted Radiofrequency Ablation

Damiano Ricci MD, Guido Grappiolo MD, Matthew Franco BA, Federico Della Rocca MD

Osteoid osteomas consist of a nidus surrounded by reactive sclerotic bone. The diagnosis typically is based on imaging and clinical presentation involving nocturnal pain. Removal of the lesion is essential and currently is performed mainly with image-guided, minimally invasive techniques. We describe a case involving an osteoid osteoma of the acetabular fossa, treated with arthroscopy-assisted radiofrequency ablation.

Unstable SCFE: Review of Treatment Modalities and Prevalence of Osteonecrosis

Ira Zaltz MD, Geneva Baca PhD, John C. Clohisy MD

The treatment of unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is rapidly evolving with the ability to correct epiphyseal alignment using the modified Dunn technique. Adopting a new treatment method depends on confirming that it achieves its goals, produces few, nonserious complications with no lasting sequelae, and improves the natural history of the disorder compared with known treatment methods. As such, the rates of osteonecrosis and complications after current treatments of unstable SCFE must be compared with those of newer surgical techniques.

The Fate of Hips That Are Not Prophylactically Pinned After Unilateral Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

Yaser M. K. Baghdadi MD, A. Noelle Larson MD, Rafael J. Sierra MD, Hamlet A. Peterson MD, Anthony A. Stans MD

The indications for prophylactic pinning of the contralateral hip after unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) remain controversial in part because the natural history of the contralateral hip is unclear.

New Radiographic Index for Evaluating Acetabular Version

Hiroshi Koyama MD, Hironobu Hoshino MD, PhD, Daisuke Suzuki MD, Shoichi Nishikino MD, Yukihiro Matsuyama MD, PhD

Several qualitative radiographic signs have been described to assess acetabular retroversion. However, quantitative assessment of acetabular version would be useful for more rigorous research purposes and perhaps to diagnose and treat hip disorders.

Case Report: Painless Chronic Liner Dissociation of a Total Hip Arthroplasty

Jorm M. Nellensteijn MD, David R. Nellensteijn MD, Tjitte Jong MD

Dislocation or liner dissociation of a total hip prosthesis usually results in pain and discomfort. Although several reports describe chronic dislocation and its treatment, chronic liner dissociation is an unreported complication.

Smoking May Be a Harbinger of Early Failure With Ultraporous Metal Acetabular Reconstruction

Adolph V. Lombardi MD, Keith R. Berend MD, Joanne B. Adams BFA, Ryan C. Jefferson BS, Michael A. Sneller BS

Smoking is considered a risk factor for surgical complications in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and has been linked to a higher rate of aseptic loosening in uncemented acetabular components. Acetabular reconstruction with newer ultraporous metals in both complex primary and revision THA has increased survivorship but it is unclear whether smoking affects survival of these implants.