Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Hip 725 articles

Articles

Scheduled Analgesic Regimen Improves Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture Surgery

Raymond Ping-Hong Chin FRCS, FHKAM, FHKCOS, Chin-Hung Ho FRCSE (Orth), FHKAM, FHKCOS, Lydia Po-Chee Cheung MSN

Postoperative pain often is the limiting factor in the rehabilitation of patients after hip fracture surgery.

No Difference in Gait Recovery After THA With Different Head Diameters: A Prospective Randomized Study

Luigi Zagra MD, Federica Anasetti MSEng, Luca Bianchi MD, Vittorio Licari MD, Roberto Giacometti Ceroni MD

Larger femoral heads are commonly presumed to improve joint stability and hip biomechanics; some studies have suggested they may hasten recovery of a normal gait. To our knowledge, no gait analysis studies have compared different size head diameters in THA.

Case Reports: Anteroinferior Acetabular Rim Damage Due to Femoroacetabular Impingement

Lisa M. Tibor MD, Reinhold Ganz MD, Michael Leunig MD

The most common location of labral tears and chondral damage in the hip is the anterosuperior region of the acetabulum, which is associated with pain in flexion and rotation. We describe a case series of patients with labral tears, ganglion formation, and chondromalacia isolated to the anteroinferior acetabulum. Clinically, patients had pain in extension and internal rotation.

Two or More Impingement and/or Instability Deformities Are Often Present in Patients With Hip Pain

Lisa M. Tibor MD, Gunnar Liebert MD, Reto Sutter MD, Franco M. Impellizzeri PhD, Michael Leunig MD

Damage to the hip can occur due to impingement or instability caused by anatomic factors such as femoral and acetabular version, neck-shaft angle, alpha angle, and lateral center-edge angle (CEA). The associations between these anatomic factors and how often they occur in a painful hip are unclear but if unaddressed might explain failed hip preservation surgery.

Do Young, Active Patients Perceive Advantages After Surface Replacement Compared to Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty?

Robert L. Barrack MD, Erin L. Ruh MS, Michael E. Berend MD, Craig J. Della Valle MD, C. Anderson Engh MD, Javad Parvizi MD, FRCS, John C. Clohisy MD, Ryan M. Nunley MD

Potential advantages suggested but not confirmed for surface replacement arthroplasty (SRA) over THA include lower frequency of limp, less thigh pain, less limb length discrepancy, and higher activity.

Spontaneous Hip Labrum Regrowth After Initial Surgical Débridement

Geoffrey D. Abrams, Marc R. Safran MD, Hassan Sadri MD

Anecdotal evidence from second-look hip arthroscopies and animal studies has suggested spontaneous labral regrowth may occur after débridement. However, these observations have not been systematically confirmed.

Valgus Hip With High Antetorsion Causes Pain Through Posterior Extraarticular FAI

Klaus A. Siebenrock MD, Simon Damian Steppacher MD, Pascal Cyrill Haefeli MD, Joseph Michael Schwab MD, Moritz Tannast MD

Valgus hips with increased antetorsion present with lack of external rotation and posterior hip pain that is aggravated with hip extension and external rotation. This may be the result of posterior femoroacetabular impingement (FAI).

Oxford Hip Scores at 6 Months and 5 Years Are Associated With Total Hip Revision Within the Subsequent 2 Years

Peter Devane MD, Geoffrey Horne MD, Daniel J. Gehling MD

The Oxford hip score (OHS) is commonly reported in research studies as a reflection of pain and function but it is unclear whether it predicts subsequent prosthesis failure.

Femoral Remodeling Around Charnley Total Hip Arthroplasty Is Unpredictable

Matthew J. Teusink MD, Katharine A. Callaghan BA, Noelle F. Klocke MS, Devon D. Goetz MD, John J. Callaghan MD

There are two unusual remodeling patterns of the proximal femur around well-fixed Charnley total hip arthroplasties: cortical thinning leading to endosteal widening around the femoral component and hypertrophy of the distal femoral cortex. Previous studies have shown remodeling patterns are affected by stem design and occur early postoperatively. It is unclear if these changes are related to patient demographics or if they progress throughout the lifetime of the implant.

Method of Fixation Does Not Influence the Overall Risk of Rerevision in First-time Cup Revisions

Maziar Mohaddes MD, Göran Garellick MD, PhD, Johan Kärrholm MD, PhD

During the last two decades, uncemented fixation has been increasingly preferred worldwide during cup revision surgery. In Sweden, the number of uncemented cup revisions has been increasing during the last decade. However, it is unclear whether the risk of rerevision differs between cemented and uncemented cups.