Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Online First™

Articles

Classifications in Brief: Walch Classification of Primary Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis

Kiet V. Vo BA, BS, Daniel J. Hackett MD, Albert O. Gee MD, Jason E. Hsu MD
17th March 2017, In Brief

What Adverse Events and Injuries Are Cited in Anesthesia Malpractice Claims for Nonspine Orthopaedic Surgery?

Christopher D. Kent MD, Linda S. Stephens PhD, Karen L. Posner PhD, Karen B. Domino MD, MPH
2nd March 2017, Symposium: Learning From Large-Scale Orthopaedic Databases

Malpractice claims that arise during the perioperative care of patients receiving orthopaedic procedures will frequently involve both orthopaedic surgeons and anesthesiologists. The Anesthesia Closed Claims database contains anesthesia malpractice claim data that can be used to investigate patient safety events arising during the care of orthopaedic patients and can provide insight into the medicolegal liability shared by the two specialties.

Increased Mortality After Prosthetic Joint Infection in Primary THA

Per Hviid Gundtoft MD, PhD, Alma Becic Pedersen MD, PhD, DMSc, Claus Varnum MD, PhD, Søren Overgaard MD, DMSc
24th February 2017, Clinical Research

Revision for prosthetic joint infection (PJI) has a major effect on patients’ health but it remains unclear if early PJI after primary THA is associated with a high mortality.

What Are the Frequency, Associated Factors, and Mortality of Amputation and Arthrodesis After a Failed Infected TKA?

Min-Sun Son PhD, Edmund Lau MS, Javad Parvizi MD, Michael A. Mont MD, Kevin J. Bozic MD, MBA, Steven Kurtz PhD
24th February 2017, Symposium: Learning From Large-Scale Orthopaedic Databases

For patients with failed surgical treatment of an infected TKA, salvage operations such as arthrodesis or above-knee amputation (AKA) may be considered. Clinical and institutional factors associated with AKA and arthrodesis after a failed TKA have not been investigated in a large-scale population, and the utilization rate and trend of these measures are not well known.

Report of the Clinical and Functional Primary Outcomes in Men of the ACL-SPORTS Trial: Similar Outcomes in Men Receiving Secondary Prevention With and Without Perturbation Training 1 and 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction

Amelia J. H. Arundale PT, DPT, Kathleen Cummer PT, DPT, Jacob J. Capin PT, DPT, MS, Ryan Zarzycki PT, DPT, Lynn Snyder-Mackler PT, ATC, ScD
21st February 2017, Symposium: Improving Care for Patients With ACL Injuries: A Team Approach

Athletes often are cleared to return to activities 6 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction; however, knee function measures continue to improve up to 2 years after surgery. Interventions beyond standard care may facilitate successful return to preinjury activities and improve functional outcomes. Perturbation training has been used in nonoperative ACL injury and preoperative ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, but has not been examined in postoperative ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, specifically return to sport rehabilitation.

Report of the Primary Outcomes for Gait Mechanics in Men of the ACL-SPORTS Trial: Secondary Prevention With and Without Perturbation Training Does Not Restore Gait Symmetry in Men 1 or 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction

Jacob John Capin PT, DPT, MS, Ryan Zarzycki PT, DPT, Amelia Arundale PT, DPT, SCS, Kathleen Cummer PT, PhD, DPT, Lynn Snyder-Mackler PT, ScD, FAPTA
21st February 2017, Symposium: Improving Care for Patients With ACL Injuries: A Team Approach

Movement asymmetries during walking are common after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction and may influence the early development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. Preoperative neuromuscular training (like perturbation training, which is neuromuscular training requiring selective muscle activation in response to surface perturbations) improves gait asymmetries and functional outcomes among people who are ACL-deficient, but the effect of postoperative perturbation training on gait mechanics after ACL reconstruction is unknown.

Hamstring Autograft versus Patellar Tendon Autograft for ACL Reconstruction: Is There a Difference in Graft Failure Rate? A Meta-analysis of 47,613 Patients

Brian T. Samuelsen MD, MBA, Kate E. Webster PhD, Nick R. Johnson BS, Timothy E. Hewett PhD, Aaron J. Krych MD
15th February 2017, Symposium: Improving Care for Patients With ACL Injuries: A Team Approach

Bone-patellar tendon-bone (bone-tendon-bone) and four-strand hamstring tendon grafts (hamstring) are the most commonly utilized autografts for primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Existing clinical trials, registry studies, and meta-analyses offer conflicting opinions regarding the most favorable graft choice.