Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Online First™

Articles

Does Extracellular DNA Production Vary in Staphylococcal Biofilms Isolated From Infected Implants versus Controls?

Beata Zatorska MSc, Marion Groger PhD, Doris Moser PhD, Magda Diab-Elschahawi MD, MSc, Luigi Segagni Lusignani MD, Elisabeth Presterl MD, MBA
13th February 2017, Basic Research

Prosthetic implant infections caused byandare major challenges for early diagnosis and treatment owing to biofilm formation on the implant surface. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is actively excreted from bacterial cells in biofilms, contributing to biofilm stability, and may offer promise in the detection or treatment of such infections.

Editorial Comment: Symposium: The 3rd Annual Meeting of Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRISM)

Matthew D. Milewski MD, Hank G. Chambers MD
13th February 2017, Symposium: The 3rd Annual Meeting of Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRISM)

Exchangeable Femoral Neck (Dual-Modular) THA Prostheses Have Poorer Survivorship Than Other Designs: A Nationwide Cohort of 324,108 Patients

Sandrine Colas MSc, MPH, Assia Allalou MSc, Antoine Poichotte MD, Philippe Piriou MD, PhD, Rosemary Dray-Spira MD, PhD, Mahmoud Zureik MD, PhD
13th February 2017, Clinical Research

Exchangeable neck stems, defined as those with a dual taper (that is, a modular junction between the femoral head and the femoral neck and an additional junction between the neck and the stem body), were introduced in THA to improve restoration of joint biomechanics (restoring anteversion, offset, and limb length) and reduce the risk of dislocation. However exchangeable necks have been reported to result in adverse effects such as stem fractures and acute local tissue reaction. Whether they result in a net improvement to or impairment of reconstructive survivorship remains controversial.

Use of Compressive Osseointegration Endoprostheses for Massive Bone Loss From Tumor and Failed Arthroplasty: A Viable Option in the Upper Extremity

Krista A. Goulding MD, MPH, Adam Schwartz MD, Steven J. Hattrup MD, R. Lor Randall MD, Donald Lee MD, Damian M. Rispoli MD, Daniel M. Lerman MD, Christopher Beauchamp MD
13th February 2017, Clinical Research

Endoprostheses using principles of compressive osseointegration have shown good survivorship in several studies involving the lower extremity; however, no series to our knowledge have documented the use of this technology in the management of massive bone loss in the upper limb.

Matrix Metalloproteases 1 and 3 Promoter Gene Polymorphism Is Associated With Rotator Cuff Tear

Jorge H. Assunção MD, Alexandre L. Godoy-Santos PhD, Maria Cristina L. G. Santos PhD, Eduardo A. Malavolta PhD, Mauro E. C. Gracitelli PhD, Arnaldo A. Ferreira Neto PhD
3rd February 2017, Clinical Research

Studies suggest that the collagen degeneration and disordered arrangement of collagen fibers in rotator cuff tears are associated with an increase in activity of matrix metalloproteases 1 and 3 (MMP-1 and MMP-3), and that MMP activity may be in part genetically mediated. The degree to which this might be clinically relevant in patients with rotator cuff tears has not been well characterized.

Do Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived From Atypical Lipomatous Tumors Have Greater Differentiation Potency Than Cells From Normal Adipose Tissues?

Hiroyuki Inatani MD, Norio Yamamoto MD, PhD, Katsuhiro Hayashi MD, PhD, Hiroaki Kimura MD, PhD, Akihiko Takeuchi MD, PhD, Shinji Miwa MD, PhD, Takashi Higuchi MD, Kensaku Abe MD, Yuta Taniguchi MD, Satoshi Yamada MD, PhD, Kiyofumi Asai MD, PhD, Takanobu Otsuka MD, PhD, Hiroyuki Tsuchiya MD, PhD
2nd February 2017, Basic Research

The p53 protein in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) regulates differentiation to osteogenic or adipogenic lineage. Because p53 function is depressed in most malignancies, if MSCs in malignancy also have p53 hypofunction, differentiation therapy to osteogenic or adipogenic lineage may be an effective treatment. We therefore wished to begin to explore this idea by evaluating atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma (ALT/WDL) cells, because murine double minute 2 (MDM2) gene amplification, which leads to p53 hypofunction, is found in almost all ALT/WDLs.

Can Spatiotemporal Fluoride (18 F− ) Uptake be Used to Assess Bone Formation in the Tibia? A Longitudinal Study Using PET/CT

Henrik Lundblad MD, PhD, Charlotte Karlsson-Thur MD, PhD, Gerald Q. Maguire PhD, Cathrine Jonsson PhD, Marilyn E. Noz PhD, Michael P. Zeleznik PhD, Lars Weidenhielm MD, PhD
1st February 2017, Clinical Research

When a bone is broken for any reason, it is important for the orthopaedic surgeon to know how bone healing is progressing. There has been resurgence in the use of the fluoride (F) ion to evaluate various bone conditions. This has been made possible by availability of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT hybrid scanners together with cyclotrons. Absorbed on the bone surface from blood flow,Fattaches to the osteoblasts in cancellous bone and acts as a pharmacokinetic agent, which reflects the local physiologic activity of bone. This is important because it shows bone formation indicating that the bone is healing or no bone formation indicating no healing. AsFis extracted from blood in proportion to blood flow and bone formation, it thus enables determination of bone healing progress.