Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Online First™

Articles

Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis After TKA: Aspirin, Warfarin, Enoxaparin, or Factor Xa Inhibitors?

Abiram Bala MD, James I. Huddleston MD, Stuart B. Goodman MD, PhD, William J. Maloney MD, Derek F. Amanatullah MD, PhD
31st May 2017, Clinical Research

There is considerable debate regarding the ideal agent for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis after TKA. Numerous studies and meta-analyses have yet to provide a clear answer and often omit one or more of the commonly used agents such as aspirin, warfarin, enoxaparin, and factor Xa inhibitors.

Reliability and Validity of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Scoring System for the Upper Extremity in Japanese Patients

Kosuke Uehara MD, Koichi Ogura MD, Toru Akiyama MD, Yusuke Shinoda MD, Shintaro Iwata MD, Eisuke Kobayashi MD, Yoshikazu Tanzawa MD, Tsukasa Yonemoto MD, Hirotaka Kawano MD, Akira Kawai MD
30th May 2017, Basic Research

The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) scoring system developed in 1993 is a widely used disease-specific evaluation tool for assessment of physical function in patients with musculoskeletal tumors; however, only a few studies have confirmed its reliability and validity.

Can A Multivariate Model for Survival Estimation in Skeletal Metastases (PATHFx) Be Externally Validated Using Japanese Patients?

Koichi Ogura MD, PhD, Tabu Gokita MD, PhD, Yusuke Shinoda MD, PhD, Hirotaka Kawano MD, PhD, Tatsuya Takagi MD, PhD, Keisuke Ae MD, PhD, Akira Kawai MD, PhD, Rikard Wedin MD, PhD, Jonathan A. Forsberg MD, PhD
30th May 2017, Clinical Research

Objective survival estimates are important when treating or studying outcomes in patients with skeletal metastases. One decision-support tool, PATHFx (www.pathfx.org) is designed to predict each patient’s postsurgical survival trajectory at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months in patients undergoing stabilization for skeletal metastases. PATHFx has been externally validated in various western centers, but it is unknown whether it may be useful in Asian patient populations.

Pathologically Benign Lymph Nodes Can Mimic Malignancy on Imaging in Patients With Angiomatoid Fibrous Histiocytoma

Gary A. Ulaner MD, PhD, John H. Healey MD, Edward A. Athanasian MD
23rd May 2017, Clinical Research

Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma (AFH) is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, and its rarity makes studying it difficult. We found that several of our patients with AFH presented with radiologically suspicious local lymph nodes that were sampled because of their imaging characteristics, but the nodes proved to be benign on pathologic evaluation. Although the frequency of this finding is unknown, it seems important for orthopaedic oncologists who care for patients with AFH to know whether suspicious-appearing associated nodes in these patients warrant aggressive management.

Editorial Comment: Learning From Large-Scale Orthopaedic Databases

Mitchell Maltenfort PhD, Jonathan N. Grauer MD
23rd May 2017, Symposium: Learning From Large-Scale Orthopaedic Databases

Rotational Laxity Control by the Anterolateral Ligament and the Lateral Meniscus Is Dependent on Knee Flexion Angle: A Cadaveric Biomechanical Study

Timothy Lording FRACS, Gillian Corbo BSc, Dianne Bryant PhD, Timothy A. Burkhart PhD, Alan Getgood MD
23rd May 2017, Symposium: Improving Care for Patients With ACL Injuries: A Team Approach

Injury to the anterolateral ligament (ALL) has been reported to contribute to high-grade anterolateral laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Failure to address ALL injury has been suggested as a cause of persistent rotational laxity after ACL reconstruction. Lateral meniscus posterior root (LMPR) tears have also been shown to cause increased internal rotation of the knee.

Erratum to: High Interspecimen Variability in Engagement of the Anterolateral Ligament: An In Vitro Cadaveric Study

Robert N. Kent BSE, James F. Boorman-Padgett BS, Ran Thein MD, Jelle P. List MD, Danyal H. Nawabi MD, Thomas L. Wickiewicz MD, Carl W. Imhauser PhD, Andrew D. Pearle MD
18th May 2017, Erratum

No Need to be Nervous About Microsuturing?

Benjamin K. Potter MD, FACS
18th May 2017, From Bench to Bedside

What Is the Mid-term Failure Rate of Revision ACL Reconstruction? A Systematic Review

Alberto Grassi MD, Christopher Kim MD, Giulio Maria Marcheggiani Muccioli MD, Stefano Zaffagnini MD, Annunziato Amendola MD
10th May 2017, Symposium: Improving Care for Patients With ACL Injuries: A Team Approach

When anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction fails, a revision procedure may be performed to improve knee function, correct instability, and allow return to activities. The results of revision ACL reconstruction have been reported to produce good but inferior patient-reported and objective outcomes compared with primary ACL reconstruction, but the degree to which this is the case varies widely among published studies and may be influenced by heterogeneity of patients, techniques, and endpoints assessed. For those reasons, a systematic review may provide important insights.