Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Online First™

Articles

What is the Responsiveness and Respondent Burden of the New Knee Society Score?

Rajesh N. Maniar MS Orth, MCh Orth, Parul R. Maniar MS, FRCO, Debashish Chanda MS, Ortho, Dnyaneshwar Gajbhare MBBS, MD, Toral Chouhan MBA
4th April 2017, Clinical Research

Although the new Knee Society score (NKSS) has been validated by a task force, a longitudinal study of the same cohort of patients to evaluate the score’s responsiveness and respondent burden has not been reported, to our knowledge.

Readability of Orthopaedic Patient-reported Outcome Measures: Is There a Fundamental Failure to Communicate?

Jorge L. Perez MD, Zachary A. Mosher BS, Shawna L. Watson BA, Evan D. Sheppard MD, Eugene W. Brabston MD, Gerald McGwin MS, PhD, Brent A. Ponce MD
3rd April 2017, Clinical Research

Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used to quantify patients’ perceptions of functional ability. The American Medical Association and NIH suggest patient materials be written at or below 6th to 8th grade reading levels, respectively, yet one recent study asserts that few PROMs comply with these recommendations, and suggests that the majority of PROMs are written at too high of a reading level for self-administered patient use. Notably, this study was limited in its use of only one readability algorithm, although there is no commonly accepted, standard readability algorithm for healthcare-related materials. Our study, using multiple readability equations and heeding equal weight to each, hopes to yield a broader, all-encompassing estimate of readability, thereby offering a more accurate assessment of the readability of orthopaedic PROMS.

Teaching the Basics: Development and Validation of a Distal Radius Reduction and Casting Model

Mark A. Seeley MD, Peter D. Fabricant MD, MPH, J. Todd R. Lawrence MD, PhD
3rd April 2017, Clinical Research

Approximately one-third of reduced pediatric distal radius fractures redisplace, resulting in further treatment. Two major modifiable risk factors for loss of reduction are reduction adequacy and cast quality. Closed reduction and immobilization of distal radius fractures is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education residency milestone. Teaching and assessing competency could be improved with a life-like simulation training tool.

Erratum to: What is the Accuracy of Nuclear Imaging in the Assessment of Periprosthetic Knee Infection? A Meta-analysis

Steven J. Verberne MD, Remko J. A. Sonnega MD, Olivier P. P. Temmerman MD, PhD, Pieter G. Raijmakers MD, PhD
3rd April 2017, Erratum

Single-stage Acetabular Revision During Two-stage THA Revision for Infection is Effective in Selected Patients

Bernd Fink MD, Michael Schlumberger MD, Damian Oremek MD
28th March 2017, Clinical Research

The treatment of periprosthetic infections of hip arthroplasties typically involves use of either a single- or two-stage (with implantation of a temporary spacer) revision surgery. In patients with severe acetabular bone deficiencies, either already present or after component removal, spacers cannot be safely implanted. In such hips where it is impossible to use spacers and yet a two-stage revision of the prosthetic stem is recommended, we have combined a two-stage revision of the stem with a single revision of the cup. To our knowledge, this approach has not been reported before.

Do Surgeon Expectations Predict Clinically Important Improvements in WOMAC Scores After THA and TKA?

Hassan M. K. Ghomrawi PhD, MPH, Carol A. Mancuso MD, Allison Dunning MS, Alejandro Gonzalez Della Valle MD, Michael Alexiades MD, Charles Cornell MD, Thomas Sculco MD, Matthias Bostrom MD, David Mayman MD, Robert G. Marx MD, Geoffrey Westrich MD, Michael O’Dell MD, Alvin I. Mushlin MD
28th March 2017, Clinical Research

Failure of THA or TKA to meet a patient’s expectations may result in patient disappointment and litigation. However, there is little evidence to suggest that surgeons can consistently anticipate which patients will benefit from those interventions.

What Factors Influence the Biomechanical Properties of Allograft Tissue for ACL Reconstruction? A Systematic Review

Drew A. Lansdown MD, Andrew J. Riff MD, Molly Meadows MD, Adam B. Yanke MD, Bernard R. Bach MD
28th March 2017, Symposium: Improving Care for Patients With ACL Injuries: A Team Approach

Allograft tissue is used in 22% to 42% of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. Clinical outcomes have been inconsistent with allograft tissue, with some series reporting no differences in outcomes and others reporting increased risk of failure. There are numerous variations in processing and preparation that may influence the eventual performance of allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction. We sought to perform a systematic review to summarize the factors that affect the biomechanical properties of allograft tissue for use in ACL reconstruction. Many factors might impact the biomechanical properties of allograft tissue, and these should be understood when considering using allograft tissue or when reporting outcomes from allograft reconstruction.