Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Online First™

Articles

Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee Shows Variable Anatomy in Pediatric Specimens

Kevin G. Shea MD, Matthew D. Milewski MD, Peter C. Cannamela BS, Theodore J. Ganley MD, Peter D. Fabricant MD, Elizabeth B. Terhune BS, Alexandra C. Styhl BA, Allen F. Anderson MD, John D. Polousky MD
31st October 2016, Symposium: The 3rd Annual Meeting of Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRISM)

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction failure rates are highest in youth athletes. The role of the anterolateral ligament in rotational knee stability is of increasing interest, and several centers are exploring combined ACL and anterolateral ligament reconstruction for these young patients. Literature on the anterolateral ligament of the knee is sparse in regard to the pediatric population. A single study on specimens younger than age 5 years demonstrated the presence of the anterolateral ligament in only one of eight specimens; therefore, much about the prevalence and anatomy of the anterolateral ligament in pediatric specimens remains unknown.

Patients With Limited Health Literacy Ask Fewer Questions During Office Visits With Hand Surgeons

Mariano E. Menendez MD, Bastiaan T. Hoorn BS, Michael Mackert PhD, Erin E. Donovan PhD, Neal C. Chen MD, David Ring MD, PhD
28th October 2016, Clinical Research

In the midst of rapid expansion of medical knowledge and decision-support tools intended to benefit diverse patients, patients with limited health literacy (the ability to obtain, process, and understand information and services to make health decisions) will benefit from asking questions and engaging actively in their own care. But little is known regarding the relationship between health literacy and question-asking behavior during outpatient office visits.

Is Pes Cavus Alignment Associated With Lisfranc Injuries of the Foot?

Jeremy D. Podolnick MD, Daniel S. Donovan MD, Nicholas DeBellis MD, Alejandro Pino MD
28th October 2016, Clinical Research

Lisfranc (tarsometatarsal joint) injuries are relatively rare, accounting for less than 1% of all fractures, and as many as 20% of subtle Lisfranc injuries are missed at the initial patient presentation. An undiagnosed Lisfranc injury can have devastating consequences to the patient. Therefore, any factor that can raise a clinician’s index of suspicion to make this diagnosis is potentially important. The cavus foot has been associated with various maladies of the lower extremity, but to our knowledge, it has not been reported to be associated with Lisfranc injury.

Erratum to: Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions in Family Members: Does a Positive Family History Impact Phenotypic Potency?

Alex L. Gornitzky MD, R. Justin Mistovich MD, Brittany Atuahene BA, Eileen P. Storey BA, Theodore J. Ganley MD
18th October 2016, Erratum

Classifications in Brief: The Wassel Classification for Radial Polydactyly

Mary Claire Manske MD, Colin D. Kennedy MD, Jerry I. Huang MD
9th September 2016, In Brief

Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions in Family Members: Does a Positive Family History Impact Phenotypic Potency?

Alex L. Gornitzky MD, R. Justin Mistovich MD, Brittany Atuahuene BA, Eileen P. Storey BA, Theodore J. Ganley MD
6th September 2016, Symposium: The 3rd Annual Meeting of Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRISM)

Although repetitive microtrauma and athletic overuse patterns are most commonly associated with osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), recent studies have identified a potential genetic predisposition for OCD. Several case series have documented family pedigrees that support autosomal-dominant inheritance, but the families in these studies were all selected as a result of unique histories that may not accurately represent OCD inheritance patterns at large. Because there has been little investigation beyond these case reports, we aimed to describe a broader, more representative pattern of OCD inheritance applicable to all affected patients.

Does the Utilization of Allograft Tissue in Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Restore Patellar Stability?

Eric Hohn MD, Nirav K. Pandya MD
2nd September 2016, Symposium: The 3rd Annual Meeting of Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRISM)

Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is one of several surgical procedures used to treat patellofemoral instability. Use of allograft tissue can preserve autogenous tissue and may be preferable in patients with connective tissue disorders or ligamentous laxity. Although there are successful reports in adults, it is unclear if the use of allograft tissue in MPFL reconstruction can restore patellofemoral stability in children and adolescents.