Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Symposium: Arthroscopy 9 articles

Articles

Arthroscopically Determined Degree of Injury After Shoulder Dislocation Relates to Recurrence Rate

Vicente Gutierrez MD, Juan Edo Monckeberg MD, PhD, Miguel Pinedo MD, Fernando Radice MD

The glenohumeral joint is the most mobile articulation in the body and the most commonly dislocated diarthrodial joint with peaks in the incidence of dislocation occurring during the second and sixth decades. Age at the time of the initial dislocation is inversely related to the recurrence rate. Traumatic anterior instability is often associated with intraarticular injuries. The frequency of injuries may increase with dislocation or subluxation episodes.

Is Selective Arthroscopic Revision Beneficial for Treating Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability?

Guillermo Arce MD, Francisco Arcuri MD, Diego Ferro MD, Enrique Pereira MD

Surgeons have traditionally treated recurrent shoulder dislocation by open methods. With the advent of arthroscopic repair techniques some surgeons reported higher recurrence rates than with open methods but some of those reports included patients with a variety of problems, including bone loss and those continuing in contact sports. It is unclear whether recurrence rates would be higher in patients without bone loss and those willing to forego contact sports.

Do Patients With Traumatic Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability Have Generalized Joint Laxity?

Maximiliano Ranalletta MD, Santiago Bongiovanni MD, Federico Suarez MD, Juan Manuel Lopez Ovenza MD, Gaston Maignon MD

A number of studies suggest a relationship between generalized joint laxity (GJL) and increased risk of some musculoskeletal injuries. However, there are conflicting data on the association between GJL and traumatic recurrent shoulder instability (RSI).

Arthroscopic Scapholunate Joint Reduction. Is an Effective Treatment for Irreparable Scapholunate Ligament Tears?

Martín Caloia MD, Hugo Caloia MD, Enrique Pereira MD

Irreparable tears to the scapholunate (SL) interosseous ligament area are common causes of mechanical wrist pain and yet treatment of this condition remains challenging. The reduction association of the SL joint (RASL) technique alleviates pain while preserving wrist function by creating a fibrous pseudarthrosis stabilized by a cannulated screw placed through the SL joint. Although arthroscopic RASL (ARASL) is a minimally invasive alternative to the open procedure, its effectiveness in controlling pain and preserving wrist function has not been established.

Spontaneous Healing in Complete ACL Ruptures: A Clinical and MRI Study

Matias Costa-Paz MD, Miguel Angel Ayerza MD, Ignacio Tanoira MD, Juan Astoul MD, Domingo Luis Muscolo MD

Most authors believe the ACL does not spontaneously heal after a complete rupture. Although several studies have reported spontaneous healing of torn ACLs, it is difficult to determine its healing potential and whether patients will be able to return to sports activities.

Can Arthroscopically Assisted Treatment of Chronic Patellar Tendinopathy Reduce Pain and Restore Function?

Jorge Santander MD, Eduardo Zarba MD, Horacio Iraporda MD, Sebastián Puleo MD

Patellar tendinopathy is a common source of pain in athletes, especially those involved in sports with a high incidence of jumping and cutting. Changes in training programs and exercises based on eccentric quadriceps contractions often relieve patients’ symptoms. For athletes unresponsive to this treatment, some authors suggest open and arthroscopic procedures débriding either the tendon alone, or the tendon and bone.

Can Wedge Osteotomy Correct Depression of the Lateral Tibial Plateau Mimicking Posterolateral Rotatory Knee Instability?

Miguel A. Ayerza MD, Federico Suarez MD, Matias Costa-Paz MD, D. Luis Muscolo MD

The literature suggests rotatory knee instability (pseudolaxity) can be associated with depressions of the lateral tibial plateau in patients despite an intact arcuate ligament complex. Correcting this bone deformity by an open-wedge osteotomy of the lateral tibia plateau, elevating the depressed bone may restore knee stability.

Is Percutaneous Repair Better Than Open Repair in Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture?

Hugo Henríquez MD, Roberto Muñoz MD, Giovanni Carcuro MD, Christian Bastías MD

Open repair of Achilles tendon rupture has been associated with higher levels of wound complications than those associated with percutaneous repair. However, some studies suggest there are higher rerupture rates and sural nerve injuries with percutaneous repair.