Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Symposium: Advances in Polyethylene Biomaterials 4 articles

Articles

Periprosthetic UHMWPE Wear Debris Induces Inflammation, Vascularization, and Innervation After Total Disc Replacement in the Lumbar Spine

Sai Y. Veruva PhD, Todd H. Lanman MD, Jorge E. Isaza MD, Theresa A. Freeman PhD, Steven M. Kurtz PhD, Marla J. Steinbeck MT(ASCP), PhD

The pathophysiology and mechanisms driving the generation of unintended pain after total disc replacement (TDR) remain unexplored. Ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear debris from TDRs is known to induce inflammation, which may result in pain.

Is There a Difference in Revision Risk Between Metal and Ceramic Heads on Highly Crosslinked Polyethylene Liners?

Guy Cafri PhD, MStat, Elizabeth W. Paxton MA, Rebecca Love MPH, RN, Stefano A. Bini MD, Steven M. Kurtz PhD

The most common bearing surface used among primary THAs worldwide is a metal or ceramic femoral head that articulates against a highly crosslinked ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (HXLPE) acetabular liner. Despite their widespread use, relatively little is known about the comparative effectiveness of ceramic versus metal femoral heads with respect to risk of revision and dislocation as well as the role of head size in this relationship.

A Novel Technique for Assessing Antioxidant Concentration in Retrieved UHMWPE

Barbara H. Currier MChE, Douglas W. Van Citters PhD

Antioxidants added to UHMWPE to prevent in vivo oxidation are important to the long-term performance of hip and knee arthroplasty. Diffused vitamin E antioxidant polyethylene raised questions about potential in vivo elution that could cause inflammatory reactions in periprosthetic tissues and also potentially leave the implant once again prone to oxidation. Currently, there is no information on the elution, if any, of antioxidants from implant polyethylene materials in vivo.