Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ®

A Publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons ®

Symposium: ABJS Carl T. Brighton Workshop on Implant Wear and Tribocorrosion of Total Joint Replacements 14 articles

Articles

Do Retrieval Analysis and Blood Metal Measurements Contribute to Our Understanding of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions?

Patricia A. Campbell PhD, Michael S. Kung BA, Andrew R. Hsu MD, Joshua J. Jacobs MD

Metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasties (THAs) and the head-neck and neck-body junctions in modular THA are associated with a variety of local and systemic reactions to their related wear and corrosion products. Although laboratory testing is available, the relationship between laboratory values—including serum metal ion levels—and adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) remains controversial and incompletely characterized.

How Have New Bearing Surfaces Altered the Local Biological Reactions to Byproducts of Wear and Modularity?

Thomas W. Bauer MD, PhD, Patricia A. Campbell PhD, Gretchen Hallerberg MS, MSLS, AHIP

The biologic reactions to byproducts of wear or corrosion can involve innate and adaptive processes and are dependent on many factors, including the composition, size, surface properties, shape, and concentration of debris.

How Have Alternative Bearings and Modularity Affected Revision Rates in Total Hip Arthroplasty?

William M. Mihalko MD, PhD, Markus A. Wimmer PhD, Carol A. Pacione BS, Michel P. Laurent PhD, Robert F. Murphy MD, Carson Rider BS

Total hip arthroplasty (THA) continues to be one of the most successful surgical procedures in the medical field. However, over the last two decades, the use of modularity and alternative bearings in THA has become routine. Given the known problems associated with hard-on-hard bearing couples, including taper failures with more modular stem designs, local and systemic effects from metal-on-metal bearings, and fractures with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings, it is not known whether in aggregate the survivorship of these implants is better or worse than the metal-on-polyethylene bearings that they sought to replace.

Do Genetic Susceptibility, Toll-like Receptors, and Pathogen-associated Molecular Patterns Modulate the Effects of Wear?

Edward M. Greenfield PhD

Overwhelming evidence supports the concept that wear particles are the primary initiator of aseptic loosening of orthopaedic implants. It is likely, however, that other factors modulate the biologic response to wear particles. This review focuses on three potential other factors: genetic susceptibility, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs).

What Design and Material Factors Impact the Wear and Corrosion Performance in Total Elbow Arthroplasties?

Mark P. Figgie MD, Timothy M. Wright PhD, Denise Drinkwater BA

The survivorship of total elbow arthroplasties is lower than surgeons and patients would like it to be, especially in patients with posttraumatic arthritis of the elbow. To improve durability, it is important to understand the failure modes of existing implants. Total elbow arthroplasties were designed primarily for low-demand rheumatoid patients. As surgical indications have extended to more active patient populations, the mechanical performance of current designs must meet an increased mechanical burden. Evaluating the degree to which they do this will guide conclusions about which contemporary devices might still meet the need and, as importantly, what design and material changes might be needed to improve performance.

Are Biologic Treatments a Potential Approach to Wear- and Corrosion-related Problems?

R. Lane Smith PhD, Edward M. Schwarz PhD

Biological treatments, defined as any nonsurgical intervention whose primary mechanism of action is reducing the host response to wear and/or corrosion products, have long been postulated as solutions for osteolysis and aseptic loosening of total joint arthroplasties. Despite extensive research on drugs that target the inflammatory, osteoclastic, and osteogenic responses to wear debris, no biological treatment has emerged as an approved therapy. We review the extensive preclinical research and modest clinical research to date, which has led to the central conclusion that the osteoclast is the primary target. We also allude to the significant changes in health care, unabated safety concerns about chronic immunosuppressive/antiinflammatory therapies, industry’s complete lack of interest in developing an intervention for this condition, and the practical issues that have narrowly focused the possibilities for a biologic treatment for wear debris-induced osteolysis.

Which Design and Biomaterial Factors Affect Clinical Wear Performance of Total Disc Replacements? A Systematic Review

Sai Y. Veruva BS, Marla J. Steinbeck MT(ASCP), PhD, Jeffrey Toth PhD, Dominik D. Alexander PhD, MSPH, Steven M. Kurtz PhD

Total disc replacement was clinically introduced to reduce pain and preserve segmental motion of the lumbar and cervical spine. Previous case studies have reported on the wear and adverse local tissue reactions around artificial prostheses, but it is unclear how design and biomaterials affect clinical outcomes.

What is the Trouble With Trunnions?

Christina I. Esposito PhD, Timothy M. Wright PhD, Stuart B. Goodman MD, PhD, Daniel J. Berry MD

Recent studies have attributed adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) in patients with total hip arthroplasties (THAs) to tribocorrosion debris generated by modular femoral stems. The presentations of ALTR are diverse, as are the causes of it, and the biological responses can be important reasons for failure after THA.

How Has the Introduction of New Bearing Surfaces Altered the Biological Reactions to Byproducts of Wear and Modularity?

Paul H. Wooley PhD

Biological responses to wear debris were largely elucidated in studies focused on conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and some investigations of polymethymethacrylate cement and orthopaedic metals. However, newer bearing couples, in particular metal-on-metal but also ceramic-on-ceramic bearings, may induce different biological reactions.

The Surgical Options and Clinical Evidence for Treatment of Wear or Corrosion Occurring With THA or TKA

Charles A. Engh MD, Henry Ho MSc, Douglas E. Padgett MD

Wear and corrosion occurring in patients with hip and knee arthroplasty are common causes of failure leading to revision surgery. A variety of surgical approaches to these problems have been described, with varying efficacy. Polyethylene wear, metal-on-metal (MoM) hip bearing wear, and problems associated with modular taper corrosion are the areas of greatest clinical impact; results of revisions for these problems are likely to dictate a large portion of revision resources for the foreseeable future, and so they call for specific study.

What Are the Current Clinical Issues in Wear and Tribocorrosion?

Daniel J. Berry MD, Matthew P. Abdel MD, John J. Callaghan MD

Wear and corrosion in joint arthroplasty are important causes of failure. From the standpoint of current clinical importance, there are four main categories of wear and tribocorrosion: polyethylene wear, ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearing wear, metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing wear, and taper tribocorrosion. Recently, problems with wear in the knee have become less prominent as have many issues with hip polyethylene (PE) bearings resulting from the success of crosslinked PE. However, MoM articulations and taper tribocorrosion have been associated with soft tissue inflammatory responses, and as a result, they have become prominent clinical concerns.

Are There Biological Markers for Wear or Corrosion? A Systematic Review

D. Rick Sumner PhD, Ryan Ross PhD, Ed Purdue PhD

Identification of biomarkers associated with wear and tribocorrosion in joint arthroplasty would be helpful to enhance early detection of aseptic loosening and/or osteolysis and to improve understanding of disease progression. There have been several new reports since the last systematic review (which covered research through mid-2008) justifying a new assessment.

What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Imaging Modalities to Diagnose Wear-related Corrosion Problems?

Denis Nam MD, Robert L. Barrack MD, Hollis G. Potter MD

Adverse tissue reactions are known to occur after total hip arthroplasty using both conventional and metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings and after MoM hip resurfacing arthroplasty (SRA). A variety of imaging tools, including ultrasound (US), CT, and MRI, have been used to diagnose problems associated with wear after MoM hip arthroplasty and corrosion at the head-trunnion junction; however, the relative advantages and disadvantages of each remain a source of controversy.